Emily Forman/Side Effects Public Media

How A Deadly Virus Saved Organ Transplant Patients' Lives

Nearly 100,000 people are waiting for a kidney transplant in the U.S., but many will never get one. Instead they’ll stay on dialysis for the rest of their lives. A team of doctors in Philadelphia have found a possible solution to this problem, by infecting patients with a potentially fatal virus.

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On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

The opioid addiction crisis is often reported on in desperate terms. But, to the people working on the frontlines of the problem, there are known and proven approaches that can help.

Seth Herald for Side Effects

Months in prison didn’t rid Daryl of his addiction to opioids.

“Before I left the parking lot of the prison, I was shooting up getting high,” he says.

One Case Lands Indiana On Measles Watchlist

Aug 23, 2018
A rash forms on a person with measles 3-5 days after they contract the virus. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Lauren Chapman

Indiana is one of 21 states the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention placed on a watch list for measles.  The state has had one reported case of measles. It takes three to declare an outbreak. 

Michelle McAnarney said she realized her daughter Darby was different than other children soon after she was born.

"She was always a little delayed physically," said McAnarney, a Springfield resident. Darby was well over a year old when she started walking, but "once she could walk, I'm not even joking the next day she was running," she said.

If McAnarney and her husband took Darby, who is now four years old, to loud or chaotic places, she'd become overwhelmed -- tip a plate over in a restaurant, throw a tantrum in a grocery store -- in an attempt to exit the situation.

Who Do First Responders Call For Help?

Aug 9, 2018
Lauren Bavis/Side Effects Public Media

Blood has a distinct, coppery scent. If that's what Brandon Dreiman smelled when he stepped off the fire truck, he knew his job wasn’t going to be easy.

Jake Harper / Side Effects Public Media

Boxes are piled high in Anne Hickman’s hallway. Family photos peek out from behind the stacks in her one-bedroom Indianapolis apartment.

Illinois Issues: Dying Young In Illinois - Black Teens Face The Greatest Risk

Jul 31, 2018
Alex Wroblewski/Illinois Public Radio

Blair Holt was riding on a Chicago bus when he was shot and killed 11 years ago. His mother, Annette Nance-Holt, says she still regrets that she had plans that afternoon that prevented her from giving Blair a ride. The 16-year-old honor student had to get from his south side high school to the Roseland neighborhood to help out at his grandparents' store.

He was shot while trying to shield a friend from the gunfire. Her son, she said, was happy and healthy when she last saw him that day. He had just gotten his braces removed.

Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

When Toni and Jim Hoy adopted their son Daniel as a toddler, they did not plan to give him back to the state of Illinois 10 years later.

For Many College Students, Hunger 'Makes It Hard To Focus'

Jul 31, 2018

As students enter college this fall, many will hunger for more than knowledge. Up to half of college students in recent published studies say they either are not getting enough to eat or are worried about it.

It's hard enough for employers to find workers to fill open jobs these days, but on top of it, many prospective hires are failing drug tests.

The Belden electric wire factory in Richmond, Ind., is taking a novel approach to both problems: It now offers drug treatment, paid for by the company, to job applicants who fail the drug screen. Those who complete treatment are also promised a job.

1,400 Nursing Homes Get Lower Medicare Ratings Because Of Staffing Concerns

Jul 30, 2018
Photo by Matt Sawyers is licensed under CC0. https://pixabay.com/en/senior-healthcare-home-medical-care-599806/

Medicare has lowered its star ratings for staffing levels in 1 in 11 of the nation’s nursing homes — almost 1,400 of them — because they either had inadequate numbers of registered nurses or failed to provide payroll data that proved they had the required nursing coverage, federal records released last week show.

Medicare only recently began collecting and publishing payroll data on the staffing of nursing homes as required by the Affordable Care Act of 2010, rather than relying as it had before on the nursing homes’ own unverified reports.

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The Workaround

The Workaround: A New Podcast From Side Effects Public Media

These are stories of the difficult and sometimes shocking things people do to work around the American healthcare system.

Side Effects, Indiana

Public health news focused on Indiana

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