Side Effects

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Seth Herald for Side Effects

Months in prison didn’t rid Daryl of his addiction to opioids.

“Before I left the parking lot of the prison, I was shooting up getting high,” he says.

Jake Harper / Side Effects Public Media

Boxes are piled high in Anne Hickman’s hallway. Family photos peek out from behind the stacks in her one-bedroom Indianapolis apartment.

Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy / U.S. Air Force

Kentucky has one of the worst outbreaks of Hepatitis A in the country, and the liver disease has spread to several other Midwest states including Ohio, Tennessee and Indiana.

 


flickr/cindyshebley/CC BY-NC 2.0

Ohio is among one of the hardest hit states by the opioid crisis. Yet, for five years in a row, Ohio along with every state in the U.S. has seen a continuous drop in opioid prescriptions.  Still the number of people who die from opioid overdoses continues to climb. This is all part of a national trend captured in a recent report from the American Medical Association.

Lauren Bavis / Side Effects Public Media

Courtney Reimlinger was breastfeeding her week-old son last year when she felt a pain in her chest.

The pain was excruciating, the 23-year-old Indianapolis native remembers, much worse than the 10 hours in labor she'd spent a week before. It spread up her neck and into her head, and soon she was slipping in and out of consciousness.

Emily Forman / Side Effects Public Media

Tamitria Jernigan takes her daughter Tashea to the Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St. Vincent’s in Indianapolis every three weeks for a blood transfusion. Tashea has a blood disorder known as sickle cell disease, and it caused her to have a stroke when she was two years old. The regular blood transfusions prevent her from having another one.


flickr/snakegirlproductions/CC BY-NC 2.0

Across the country, states desperate to prevent opioid addiction are increasingly looking to medical cannabis as a solution. Lawmakers in several states, including New York, Indiana, Georgia and Tennessee, have taken action to initiate or expand their medical marijuana programs to try and address the opioid crisis.

Illinois is trying to do the same.

Emily Forman / Side Effects Public Media

Doctor Emily Meier usually practices hematology at the Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center in Indianapolis. But four times a year Meier and her team drive two hours north to Lake County, Indiana and host a clinic for children diagnosed with sickle cell disease.


Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

DeVonte Jones began to show signs of schizophrenia as a teenager. His first public episode was nine years ago at a ball game at Wavering Park in Quincy, Illinois.

“He snapped out and just went around and started kicking people,” said Jones’ mother Linda Colon, who now lives in Midlothian in the Chicago suburbs.


Courtesy of the Regenstrief Institute

Patients are safer and health care costs are lower when providers electronically share patient information through health information exchanges, according to a new study led by four Indiana researchers.

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