ACA

Rising Premiums Price Some Missouri And Illinois Consumers Out Of Health Care Exchange

Jul 12, 2018
DAVID KOVALUK | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

The rising costs of insurance plans available through the federal healthcare.gov website may make them unaffordable for some people in Missouri and Illinois.

Premiums for exchange plans on healthcare.gov have become more expensive, but most people who buy exchange plans on healthcare.gov receive tax credits to help them offset the cost and are insulated from rising costs. But those who don’t receive those credits bear the brunt of those increased prices.

Democrats Rally Against Threats To The ACA To Block Trump’s Supreme Court Nominee

Jul 12, 2018
Creative Commons/Pixabay

Senate Democrats, who are divided on abortion policy, are instead turning to health care as a rallying cry for opposition to President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

Specifically, they are sounding the alarm that confirming conservative District Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh could jeopardize one of the Affordable Care Act’s most popular provisions — its protections for people with preexisting health conditions.

GOP Health Plan Would Leave 23 Million More Uninsured, Budget Office Says

May 24, 2017

The revised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will leave 23 million more people uninsured in 2026 than if that act, also known as Obamacare, were to remain in place. The GOP bill would also reduce the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years.

Katherine Peraza poses with her her 3-month-old son. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
(Jill Sheridan/IPB News)

From ages 7 to 18, Katherine Peraza was a ward of the state, living with a foster family in Indianapolis for most of that time. At 19, she became pregnant. When she went to the doctor, she was hit with a surprise.  

Bram Sable-Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

Six years ago, 53-year-old Corla Morgan noticed blisters forming on her neck and back.

“I couldn’t sleep because when I took my shirt off, if my shirt touched my skin, the skin just peeled off,” Morgan says. “I was in really horrible pain.”

Cristian C / Flickr

The GOP's proposed health law, the American Health Care Act, has some mental health and addiction treatment advocates worried.

House Speaker Paul Ryan
Gage Skidmore via Flickr

With eight months left in President Obama's term, House Republicans may have finally struck a blow against his signature health care law. 

At issue are the subsidies that the federal government pays to insurance companies to bring down out-of-pocket costs for individuals and families who earn between 100 and 250 percent of the federal poverty level. House Republicans filed the suit, contending that the subsidies are unconstitutional because the President authorized the spending without the approval of Congress. Over $175 billion has been spent so far. 

Rebecca Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

With just a little over a month left in the third open enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act, some people may need a little additional help getting insurance through the ACA.

Health insurance can be a confusing topic, with its array of terminology and choices to puzzle through, from premiums and co-pays, to deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums.

A national survey by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that more than 70 percent of people surveyed after the last open enrollment period said they wanted one-on-one assistance enrolling in insurance coverage.

And people can find the help they seek in an unexpected place: their public library. While libraries are better known for books, story time and due dates – since the launch of the ACA, many libraries across the United States have embraced a new role as a go-to community resource for information on health insurance.


Rebecca Smith / Side Effects Public Media

When the University of Missouri temporarily canceled graduate student health insurance subsidies earlier this month, it highlighted a troublesome unintended consequence of the Affordable Care Act that may affect universities around the country.


Mark Fisher/CC

The Affordable Care Act passed its second major test before the Supreme Court Thursday. In King v. Burwell the Supreme Court upheld a key measure of the Affordable Care Act, ruling that federal health insurance subsidies should be allowed in all states,  regardless of whether the state has created its own insurance exchange or relies on the federal governments'.

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