heroin

Indianapolis, Indiana.
Evan Walsh

On a rainy day in Austin, Indiana, Brittany Combs, the public health nurse for Scott County, drives around in a white SUV. Medical supplies are piled high in the back of the vehicle: syringes and condoms, containers for used needles, over-the-counter medications.


Emily Forman

Tia Hosler woke up at 7:35 a.m. on a friend’s couch next to her newborn son’s crib after an overnight babysitting gig.

The 26-year-old had slept through her alarm and was late for the bus, her ride to group therapy in Fort Wayne, Indiana. And now she had to scramble. She tied her Kool-Aid-red hair into a tight bun and kissed her 2-month-old, Marsean. 


Public Restrooms Become Ground Zero In The Opioid Epidemic

May 15, 2017
Håkan Dahlström / http://bit.ly/2pOfaKF

A man named Eddie threaded through the midafternoon crowd in Cambridge, Mass. He was headed for a sandwich shop, the first stop on a tour of public bathrooms.

“I know all the bathrooms that I can and can’t get high in,” said Eddie, 39, pausing in front of the shop’s plate-glass windows, through which we can see a bathroom door.

Eugene Peretz/Flickr

A new study from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at IUPUI in Indianapolis has found that restricting opioid prescriptions may have an unintended side effect: more overdose deaths involving heroin and fentanyl. The study also shows that Indiana’s reports don’t reflect the actual number of overdose deaths in which opioid drugs are present.

Jake Harper / Side Effects

When someone dies unexpectedly outside of a hospital in Marion County, Alfarena Ballew, chief deputy coroner, gets a call.


Karen Shakerdge

In a big hotel conference room in Times Square, six doctors huddle around a greasy piece of pork. They watch as an addiction medicine specialist, Michael Frost, delicately marks the meat, incises it and implants four match-sized rods.

“If you can do it well on the pork, you can easily do it on the person,” Frost tells his audience.

Frost is training the group of doctors to implant the newly FDA-approved drug Probuphine. 

Details On Death Certificates Offer Layers Of Clues To Opioid Epidemic

Jun 1, 2016

Dr. James Gill walked through the morgue in Farmington, Conn., recently, past the dock where the bodies come in, past the tissue donations area, and stopped outside the autopsy room.

"We kind of have a typical board listing all of the decedents for the day," Gill said, pointing to the list of names on a dry-erase board. "Overdose, overdose, overdose, overdose, overdose. That's just for today."

Rhode Island Gov. Unveils Plan To Reduce Overdose Deaths

May 17, 2016
An ambulance driving fast
Shutterstock

The plan, developed by a task force of experts, calls for decreasing the number of overdose deaths by a third in three years. 

In the past few years, deaths from illicit drug overdose have climbed 50 percent in Rhode Island. One major reason: fentanyl, a drug 50 times as potent as heroin that’s being mixed into the heroin supply. Today, Gov. Gina Raimondo unveiled new initiatives to combat the rising number of deaths.

When she was 17, Tracey Helton Mitchell was prescribed an opioid pain killer after getting her wisdom teeth extracted. The medicine helped her deal with the pain related to the extraction, but when the prescription ran out, her desire for its euphoric high remained. That's when she turned to heroin.

Walgreens Offers Naloxone Over-The-Counter In Indiana And Ohio

Feb 26, 2016
Anthony92931 via Wikimedia Commons

Walgreens Monday announced it will offer over-the-counter distribution of the opioid overdose drug naloxone in all its stores in Indiana and Ohio.

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