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Why Getting Mental Health Care Can Be A Struggle For Refugees

Kazito Kalima was 14 at the start of the Rwandan genocide. Over just a few months in 1994 , hundreds of thousands of Tutsi people in his country were killed, including most of his family.

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Happier Birth Days: A Two-Part Panel Discussion

Experts explore what it will take to improve birth and health outcomes for Indiana's black moms and babies.

Indianapolis Begins Mobile Syringe Exchange Program

Apr 10, 2019
Jill Sheridan/IPB News

Indiana’s ninth syringe exchange program was launched in Marion County. 

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Side Effects reporter Araceli Gomez-Aldana joined WFYI's No Limits to talk about her reporting on sleep and wellness. Other guests included Indianapolis Fire Department Capt. Chris Moran and Indianapolis Metro Police Department Sgt. Aaron Snyder.

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For years, transplant surgeons have been reluctant to use organs from people who were infected with hepatitis C, due to fears of spreading the virus. But a new study gives hope to the tens of thousands of people waiting for a transplant.

The opioid epidemic has ravaged cities across the United States. And just a couple of years ago, Dayton, Ohio, had one of the nation’s worst overdose death rates. Now, overdose deaths have decreased, and Ohioans impacted by addiction are sharing stories of hope.

For a second time in nine months, the same federal judge has struck down the Trump administration's plan to force some Medicaid recipients to work to maintain benefits.

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Panelists at Side Effects Public Media’s two-part Happier Birth Days conversation answered viewer questions about maternal and infant health disparities in Indiana’s black communities. But there wasn’t time to answer all questions. Indiana State Health Commissioner Dr.

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Some doctors see access to birth control as a tool in the fight to decrease maternal and infant mortality. Indiana has one of the nation’s worst rates of new mothers and infants dying, and those rates are even worse for black women.

But a history of abuse has led to distrust of health care professionals in communities of color. 

Health researchers in Indiana are knocking on doors to collect surveys – and DNA samples. A growing number of studies factor in zip code when considering health outcomes.

Photo courtesy of Carrie Vickery.

A small but growing number of U.S. women are choosing to have their babies at home. In more than 30 states, including most of the Midwest, it’s legal for certified professional midwives – trained specifically in home birth – to assist them.

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Across much of the Midwest, maternal and infant death rates are high—especially among African-Americans. So doctors, public health agencies and non-profit organizations are searching for solutions.

Among them is Sistering CU in Champaign-Urbana, Ill. It offers free home visits from trained volunteers to families with babies up to six months in age. It also recently launched a support group for new parents.


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The Workaround: A New Podcast From Side Effects Public Media

These are stories of the difficult and sometimes shocking things people do to work around the American health care system.

The Workaround: A Video Series

A deeper look at how everyday people work around the American health care system.

On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

The opioid addiction crisis is often reported on in desperate terms. But, to the people working on the frontlines of the problem, there are known and proven approaches that can help.