Courtesy of Northwestern Medicine

COVID-19 Patient Who Received Double-Lung Transplant Faces Long Road To Recovery

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, 28-year-old Mayra Ramirez was working as a paralegal for an immigration law firm in Chicago. She enjoyed walking her dogs and running 5K races. Ramirez has a condition requiring medication that could’ve suppressed her immune system but was otherwise healthy. When the Illinois governor issued a shelter-in-place order in March, she began working from home, hardly leaving the house. So she has no idea how she contracted COVID-19.

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Wikimedia Commons

July marked 30 years since President Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act into law. And while the U.S. has come far since then, the nation still has a long way to go when it comes to achieving health equity. The current public health crisis of COVID-19 has only exacerbated existing inequities for people with disabilities. 

States continue to reopen, but the COVID-19 pandemic is far from over, according to experts on Indiana Public Broadcasting’s All IN talk show. The experts discussed the current state of the pandemic and how state officials have responded — as well as the need for more data.

¿Qué Pasa, Midwest? Season 5: Helpers In The COVID Crisis

Aug 4, 2020

¿Qué Pasa, Midwest? is a bilingual podcast for midwestern Latinx who are missing an essential piece of their cultural identity. By sharing their stories, it aims to build a sense of hope and community. Season 5 tackles the coronavirus — but not through statistics and news. This season is about the people who are finding solutions to problems caused by the pandemic.

Courtesy of Angela Kender

More than 1,200 people in Missouri have died from COVID-19. As the toll rises each day, the human aspect can get obscured. Angela Kender is looking to change that.

After losing her mother to COVID-19 in June, Kender started a project to commemorate other victims. She’s collecting their photographs at missouricovidmemorial@gmail.com. She has already has dozens of photos, and plans to show them to lawmakers at the Missouri state capitol.

You Asked: How Contact Tracing Works

Jul 31, 2020
Photo by GORDON JOHNSON/Pixabay

Experts say contact tracing is key to understanding and managing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and many community members have questions about the process. Side Effects received dozens of those questions through our partnership with Indiana Public Broadcasting. 

Indiana Department of Correction

Under COVID-19 restrictions, inmates at the Indiana Women’s Prison have spent many hours a day locked in their cells, which do not have toilets or running water and can get hotter than outside. The conditions have prompted health and fire safety concerns from advocates, politicians — even employees — especially in recent weeks as temperatures climbed.

But the prison recently took one step to help with those concerns, at least temporarily. 

Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media

Dr. Blessing Ogbemudia graduated from Indiana University’s medical school in May. As he was celebrating with a few friends, he received an anonymous message on Instagram. It contained an audio clip of someone talking about him. 

Credit Kristina Ortiz

Kristina Ortiz and Tim Himes aren’t brother and sister by blood, but they might as well be. They’ve never known life apart. Ortiz was six months old when her foster mother brought Himes home from the hospital.  

“I’m always there for you,” Himes said on a video call with Ortiz. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a stressful time, and a lot of people experiencing anxiety and depression might be feeling it for the first time.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s All In spoke with mental health experts about what these things feel like, why they happen and what can be done to help.

Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

As universities prepare to welcome students back to campus for the fall semester, some are counting on widespread COVID-19 testing to help clamp down on potential outbreaks. 

At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, large white tents, with signs reading “Walk-Up COVID-19 Testing,” have been popping up across campus.

Pages

Coronavirus: What You Need To Know

The new coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19, have changed our lives in countless ways. Side Effects will explain the important medical issues, as well as their impact on the Midwest.

America Amplified

Side Effects is part of the America Amplified project, which aims to put people, not preconceived ideas, at the center of its reporting process.

Essential Voices

Front-line workers on the COVID-19 crisis

Slammed: Rural Health Care and COVID-19

Stories examining the effect of COVID-19 on rural health care.

Rust to Resilience

Stories highlighting what climate change means for Great Lakes cities.

Seeking A Cure: The Quest To Save Rural Hospitals

Across the country, many small rural hospitals are having financial problems. In less than a decade, more than a hundred have closed.

A Quiet Crisis

Side Effects examines what responsibility schools have in this fight, and what counselors, teachers and administrators are doing to address this quiet crisis.

Read More: Indiana News

Daily health news from public radio stations around the state.

Healthy In Any Language

Throughout 2019, Side Effects will examine the health care challenges that refugees and immigrants face in the U.S.