Araceli Gómez-Aldana

Reporter, WFYI

Araceli is a reporter with Side Effects and WFYI in Indianapolis. Previously Araceli was a reporter and local All Things Considered host at WBOI in Fort Wayne. She started her radio career at WFHB in Bloomington, IN, as a producer and host of HOLA Bloomington and co-anchor of WFHB’s Daily Local News.

She is a graduate of Indiana University, where she received a bachelor's degree in journalism. While attending IU she interned at FOX59 and ABC7 Chicago. Araceli also had the opportunity to practice her reporting skills in Europe while studying abroad at the University of Seville, Spain.

Originally born in Guadalajara, México, Araceli was raised in Whiting, Indiana where she grew up playing sports and rooting for the Chicago Bulls, Bears and the White Sox. She enjoys running, playing tennis, traveling and trying new foods.

IU Health

Obesity is a big problem across the United States. It affects about 40 percent of the population. It’s even worse in Midwest states like Ohio, Illinois and Indiana and addressing the problem is complicated.

Lindsay Fox/Pixabay

Health officials say teenagers are using e-cigarettes at epidemic rates. Lawmakers in a number of Midwest states, like Indiana, Illinois and Minnesota, are addressing the problem and so is the FDA.

Mike Dickbernd / IU Health

Being a patient in a hospital, or working there, can be stressful. At IU Health North Hospital in Indianapolis, they believe pet therapy can help.

Kena Krutsinger / Chicago Bulls

Increasingly, sports teams, especially in the NBA, are hiring "sleep coaches" to help players. This follows research that good sleep can be as beneficial as performance-enhancing drugs.

Photo by Myriams-Fotos https://pixabay.com/en/boy-child-sad-alone-sit-1636731/

Dr. Wanda Thruston and Dr. Barb Pierce are examining what they call a “wicked problem” – helping children deal with trauma and violence. We sat down with the professors from Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis to discuss their work.

Photo from Wikimedia Commons is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Smoking looks a lot different these days. It’s been on the decline, due to restrictions at work and in bars and restaurants. But there is one segment—teenagers who use e-cigarettes—that is growing fast. And health experts are worried about the consequences.

 

Photo courtesy of the CDC. www.cdc.gov/flu/index.htm

Last year Indiana saw one of the worst flu season in recent years, with more than 300 reported deaths.

Photo by Steve Rainwater is licensed under CC 2.0. https://www.flickr.com/photos/steevithak/38676565790/in/photolist-21VHvxd-29CkoKn-24Xntgq-23CjviE-25N9oiy-Fkwenx-22eU9tE-HHHr9i-E27ecB-24VWTtE-MjkYbQ-L6RWTK-29qisaF-29FHLcp-25tzq3h-GRUtqw-JMDVEK-26CjHeS-2

Across the Midwest, health care has emerged as one of the year’s biggest campaign flash points — in races from U.S. Senate to state attorney general.

Photo by Arek Socha is licensed under CC 0. https://pixabay.com/en/blood-cells-red-medical-medicine-1813410/

There’s a new treatment now for thousands of patients in the U.S. who live with a rare disorder where blood doesn’t clot. The Food and Drug Administration recently approved Hemlibra, which is produced by Genentech, Inc.

Dr. Amy Shapiro is CEO of the Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center in Indianapolis.

Photo by Flickr user clogsilk is licensed under CC 2.0. https://www.flickr.com/photos/clogsilk/7036095981/in/photolist-bHKQcF-jjfaYR-8f3ZAJ-rBs5do-o7Lpgn-mGiCaB-ifCcs-4yRWha-fCdqcn-p3nA6i-52GPhg-9JmEE5-aexkpc-cgUsGq-o9Eo5n-nStkFv-85MNr3-4ojHh8-4aaQ1X-6Ynx

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn’t know why young children across the country are coming down with a rare condition called Acute Flaccid Myelitis. Many are calling AFM  a “polio-like” illness, because it causes weakness and paralysis in childrens’ arms and legs.

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