This Week In Public Health: New Addiction Treatments, Regulating Drug Prices, Sick People At Work

Jul 15, 2016

This week: Doctors are learning new tricks about how to treat addiction ... on pork. Drug price controls might not offer all the protection we hope it does. And, sick people say they work, even when they know they shouldn't.

Finding a 'Healthy Weight' in Lesbian and Bisexual Communities

Lesbian and bisexual women are more likely to be obese than their heterosexual counterparts. But what's a healthy weight for them, exactly? Bram Sable-Smith reports for KBIA.

Dr. Michael Frost, medical director of Eagleville Hospital in Conshohocken, PA and consultant for Braeburn Pharmaceuticals demonstrates insertion and removal of Probuphine at FDA required training.
Credit KAREN SHAKERDGE

New Addiction Treatment Brings New System For Doctors To Navigate

“If you can do it well on the pork, you can easily do it on the person." New addiction treatments have some doctors learning a new skill, how to administer the newly FDA-approved drug Probuphine to people trying to kick a drug habit. For Side EffectsKaren Shakerdge reports.

Sounds Like A Good Idea? Regulating Drug Prices

It seems like everyone is talking about the sky-high price of drugs. People in the U.S. pay more for many drugs than nearly every other industrialized country. The U.S. candidates for president each have an idea to get some savings, and to save you money on your prescriptions, but the ideas might not do all they are intended to. Kaiser Health News' Julie Rovner offers this video

Sick People Go To Work, Even When They Know They Shouldn't

And half of those people work at very public places, reports NPR's Rae Ellen Bichell. For people that handle food, even 20 bacteria can make people sick, and that's a real problem when diseases like norovirus have the potential to sicken many, like what happened with a recent outbreak at Chipotle. Read the story here.

What's The CDC Accompished In 70 years Of Existence?

The CDC started as an agency tasked with fighting malaria and mosquitoes, but during the last seven decades, it's grown to 22,000 staff members with 171 occupations fighting disease in 50 countries around the world. The CDC is celebrating its 70th anniversary and has a look back at what it has accomplished in that time.

Sam Tahour, district manager for Travel Centers of America, stands next to a travel plaza in Oak Grove, Mo. Tahour was trained as part of a new effort to identify and stop sex trafficking at truck stops.
Credit Frank Morris/KCUR

Truckers Take The Wheel In Effort To Halt Sex Trafficking

Truckers are the eyes and the ears of the nation on the vast stretches of highway between cities, and they often see things the public is slow to catch onto -- including sex trafficking. "Trafficking happens everywhere," says the leader of Truckers Against Trafficking. "You know, it's an everywhere problem, but truckers happen to be everywhere." For KCUR, Frank Morris reports that the group is using its eyes and ears on the open road to stop the trafficking where ever it is.