AIDS

Scientists have engineered a new molecule they say can block infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Researchers from the Scripps Research Institute say they’ve found a new way to prevent HIV from infecting cells, even if it’s present in the body.

The study was published online today in the journal Nature. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with lead author Michael Farzan.

If you want to be a pessimist about the shape the world's in, just turn on the news. It seems as if we're living in an age of terrorism, war, refugees, hostages and natural disasters.

Ruth Coker Burks was a young mother in her 20s when the AIDS epidemic hit her home state of Arkansas in the early 1980s. She took it upon herself to care for AIDS patients who were abandoned by their families, and even by medical professionals, who feared the disease.

Coker Burks, now 55, has no medical training, but she estimates that she has cared for nearly 1,000 people over the past three decades, including her friend Paul Wineland's partner.

Viruses are masters at mutating.

So the big concern with deadly viruses, like Ebola and hepatitis C, is that they will evolve into more dangerous forms over time.

It looks like just the opposite is happening with HIV — although it's happening slowly.

"HIV can generate any mutation in the book, on any day," says virologist Philip Goulder at the University of Oxford.

Ebola has rightly gripped the world's attention, but its death toll pales in comparison to other infectious diseases like tuberculosis. TB is the world's second leading infectious killer, after HIV/AIDS, and it's claiming more victims than previously thought — 1.5 million last year alone — according to a report released today by the World Health Organization.

AJ Cann/Flickr.com

“Many of the world’s AID researchers gathered in Melbourne, Australia, for their twentieth annual symposium. The event was overshadowed this year by the deaths of a number attendees who were aboard the Malaysian airlines flight that was shot down over Ukraine. Another topic on the agenda was human rights. Due to the growing number of countries, especially in Africa, that have passed laws criminalizing homosexuality. Dr. Rachel Vreeman spends a good deal of her time providing care and conducting research on HIV and AIDS in Kenya.

Sports In The Age Of HIV And Aids

Aug 15, 2014

After a week of running, jumping, figure skating and even sport dancing, the International Gay Games wrap up tomorrow in Cleveland.

When the Gay Games began in 1982, HIV/AIDS had just been recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 36 million people have died from the disease. An equal number live with HIV.

AIDS researchers and policymakers from around the globe are gathering in Melbourne, Australia, for a major international conference that starts this Monday. They'll be mourning dozens of colleagues who died in the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17.

Health Officials Push HIV Prevention Pills

Jul 12, 2014

The World Health Organization has announced a sweeping new guideline, recommending that all men who have sex with mean take antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a similar recommendation in May. For more on these announcements, Melissa Block speaks with reporter Richard Knox.

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