America Amplified

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We're continuing to answer questions about the coronavirus and COVID-19. Here are the latest; if you have more, here's how to send a question.

Do people who recover from coronavirus have any long-lasting symptoms or side effects?

It all depends on the severity of the case. Dr. Abhijit Duggal, a critical care specialist at the Cleveland Clinic, told USA Today that about 80% of COVID-19 patients recover with no complications. As for that remaining 20%, it may be too early to tell.

Now more than ever, it’s important for journalists to listen to their communities. 

That’s why Side Effects Public Media is launching the Midwest Checkup, a text tool to strengthen the connection between community members and reporters who cover health in the region.

READ MORE: You Asked: What Do I Tell My Child About Coronavirus?

Lauren Chapman/IPB News.

A number of Midwest states and cities have issued “stay-at-home” orders, in an attempt to curb the new coronavirus, which continues to rapidly spread.  The orders create restrictions on working, recreation and travel. Still, there are many things you can continue to do, and not all businesses have to close. 

¿Qué Necesita Saber Acerca Del Coronavirus? Tenemos Respuestas

Mar 20, 2020
Illustration by the CDC.

Mientras los casos del coronavirus se siguen propagando por el Medio Oeste, sabemos que hay muchas preguntas acerca del virus -- incluyendo cómo evitar contagiarse. También sabemos que hay mucha información incorrecta acerca del virus, así que queremos ayudarte a separar los hechos de la ficción. Envíe sus preguntas a health@wfyi.org o envíe un mensaje de texto con la palabra “eleccion” al 73224, y encontraremos las respuestas. 

¿Que es el coronavirus y COVID-19?

Photo by Lauren Chapman/Indiana Public Broadcasting.

We continue to answer your questions about the coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19 -- and there sure are plenty. That's to be expected as the nation convulses from unprecedented lockdowns, quarantines and other interruptions. Here are some questions we received via email, with responses from Side Effects community engagement specialist Brittani Howell:

Photo by Lauren Chapman/Indiana Public Broadcasting.

How are you dealing with the onslaught of coronavirus news? Are you suffering from loneliness, anxiety or depression? Indiana Public Broadcasting's All IN talk show brought in four experts to address these concerns and provide recommendations for managing stress. 

You Asked: Can I Boost My Immunity To Coronavirus?

Mar 15, 2020
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

UPDATE: As the case count continues to rise, information on this story is moving quickly and may be out-of-date. We recommend checking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for ways to stay safe and this John Hopkins tool for the most recent data

Side Effects has received many questions seeking medical information about the new coronavirus and the disease it causes: COVID-19. For answers, we turned to Tom Duszynski, an epidemiologist with the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI, and Ram Yeleti, Chief Physician Executive with Community Health Network. (This is the second set of questions from the March 11 All IN show from Indiana Public Broadcasting.)

corgaasbeek/ Pixabay CCO

UPDATE: As the case count continues to rise, information on this story is moving quickly and may be out-of-date. We recommend checking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for ways to stay safe and this John Hopkins tool for the most recent data

As some schools close, workers are told to telecommute and the Indianapolis-based NCAA shuts down tournaments, coronavirus is having a broader impact on our lives. To answer your questions about the changes, we got some help from Tom Duszynski, an epidemiologist with the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI, and Ram Yeleti, Chief Physician Executive with Community Health Network. They   joined Indiana Public Broadcasting’s All IN on March 11.

UPDATE: As the case count continues to rise, information on this story is moving quickly and may be out-of-date. We recommend checking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for ways to stay safe and this John Hopkins tool for the most recent data

Coronavirus cases are rising and we found many of you -- our listeners and readers -- have questions that go beyond the number of people infected with COVID-19. Questions that are tricky and complicated. Side Effects and Indiana Public Broadcasting are working to find answers, so we turned to Kara Cecil, an assistant professor of public health at the University of Indianapolis.

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

As cases of coronavirus spread across the Midwest, we know there are lots of questions about it -- including how to avoid getting sick. We also know there's plenty of misinformation about this new virus, so we want to help you sort fact from fiction. You can follow our complete coverage of the coronavirues and COVID-19, including more Q&As.

Send your questions to health@wfyi.org or text “health” to 73224, and we'll find the answers. They will be posted regularly on Side Effects. 

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