amish

Paige Pfleger, Side Effects Public Media

The Midwest is home to one of the largest Amish populations in the nation. And many of these settlements overlap with rural Appalachian counties, where access to healthcare is hard to come by. But a project in Ohio aims to help by bringing cancer screenings to Amish women. 

Paige Pfleger, Side Effects Public Media

Holmes Co., Ohio, is a patchwork of farmland. Modest houses perch on sloping hills and laundry hangs from clothes lines, flapping in the wind. There are horses and buggies – some driven by farmers in straw hats, others by women with their hair covered in bonnets, babies on their laps.

Holmes is one of the healthiest counties in Ohio. It’s also the least insured.

Ted Knudsen / Flickr

Researchers from the Indiana Hemophilia & Thrombosis Center (IHTC) and Northwestern University say a genetic mutation in some Old Order Amish living in Indiana protects them from effects of aging.

Bram Sable-Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

Before you buy a computer, or a used car or even a pair of pants, you probably know the price you'll pay. The same is not always true when buying health care.  But as people pay and more of their health care costs—thanks in part to high-deductible health plans—there's growing demand to know prices upfront. It's a concept known as price transparency.

One hospital in rural Missouri is catering to that demand, by developing a price-list for medical procedures. For help, the hospital is turning to a group who've been getting price transparency for years: the Amish and Mennonites. 

Bram Sable-Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

Millersburg, Ohio is a 700-mile drive from Unionville, Missouri, so it’s an unlikely place for a Unionville resident to schedule a medical procedure. That is, unless they’re paying cash.

It was worth it for Truman, a Mennonite farmer who lives just outside of Unionville. "The best price I could get around here, I would still save $3000 to $4000 [by] going to Ohio," he recalls.