children

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

new report finds the number of children without health insurance in Indiana has increased. This is the second year the state has followed this national trend.

The percentage of uninsured children in Indiana went up from 5.9 percent in 2016 to 6.6 percent in 2018. Georgetown University Center for Children and Families executive director Joan Alker, says Indiana is one of 13 states with increases this significant. 

Pixabay PublicDomainPictures / 17913 images

In 1983, Indianapolis hosted one of the first summits on the emotional and psychological mistreatment of children. This week,  local, state and international leaders are meeting in the city, looking for new ways to tackle the problem. 

Lisa Gillespie/Side Effects Public Media

Getting to Anne Polston’s house is a journey: first, you have to get to Liberty, a town about two hours southeast of Louisville. Then, there’s a winding eight-mile road that’s largely one-lane, and sometimes just gravel.

Indiana Child Services Director Resigns With Scathing Letter To Governor

Dec 20, 2017

Indiana Department of Child Services Director Mary Beth Bonaventura says the lives of Hoosier children has been put at risk because of steps taken by Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb’s administration.

Lead Poisoning’s Lifelong Toll Includes Lowering Social Mobility, Researchers Find

Mar 28, 2017
Joseph Choi/via Flickr

Cynthia Brownfield was lucky. When her daughter, then 2 years old, tested for high levels of lead in her blood, she could do something.

Will a kids' meal sans fries and soda still tempt the youngest diners at restaurants?

Chef Ype Von Hengst certainly thinks so. He's the co-founder of Silver Diner — a chain of fast-casual restaurants in Virginia and Maryland.

Customers want healthier options for their kids, Hengst says. "We tempt them with the stuff they like, but we make sure it's also good for them," he says.

Sandor Weisz/Flickr.com

Many children who sustain so-called open bone fractures in the forearm or lower leg can, and do, heal safely without surgery, according to the results of a small study led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.

Open fractures occur when the broken bone protrudes through the skin, causing a puncture wound.

The gargantuan budget bill that lawmakers on Capitol Hill are expected to vote on Thursday does more than dole out federal dollars to keep the government running.

It also tweaks federal nutrition rules.

For starters, the bill — aka, the 2015 Omnibus Appropriations Bill — includes a provision that will give school food directors more flexibility when it comes to adopting 100 percent whole grain items, such as pasta and biscuits, in school breakfast and lunch meals.

INDIANAPOLIS and NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. -- Imperceptible variations in movement patterns among individuals with autism spectrum disorder are important indicators of the severity of the disorder in children and adults, according to a report presented at the 2014 Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in November.

For the first time, researchers at Indiana University and Rutgers University report developing a quantitative way to assess these otherwise ignored variations in movement and link those variations to a diagnosis.

Vroom! Vroom! Ow!!!!

When it comes to toys that cause serious injuries, those little scooters kids push along with one foot are unique.

A look at trends in injuries that sent kids to the emergency room over more than 20 years shows an Everest-like mountain of problems with ride-on toys, including scooters, that reached its zenith in 2001 — an estimated 109,000 injuries.

Jennifer/Flickr.com

For children with physical disabilities, weight gain is sometimes an issue, as exercise isn’t always an option. Dr. Keith-Thomas Ayoob, the director of the nutrition clinic at the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, shares tips. 

On why weigh gain is particularly difficult for children with physical disabilities

You can lead a child to vegetables, but can you make her eat them?

A child, for instance, like Salem Tesfaye, a first-grader at Walker-Jones Educational Campus in Washington, D.C. Tesfaye picked up a lunch today that's full of nutrition: chicken in a whole-wheat wrap, chopped tomatoes and lettuce from local farms, a slice of cantaloupe and milk.

But, she confesses, sometimes she throws her lunch out. I ask her what she did today. "I threw all of it away," she says softly.

If you've seen the classic movie A Christmas Story, you know that Ralphie really, really wanted that BB gun. And you know that his mother, his teacher, even the department store Santa all said: "You'll shoot your eye out."

Treatment Strategy May Reduce Infants' Wheezing Caused By Virus

Nov 21, 2014
Robert Boston

The antibiotic azithromycin may reduce the risk of recurrent wheezing in infants hospitalized with a common respiratory infection, according to a small pilot study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Evidence suggests that reduced wheezing may lower an infant’s risk of developing asthma over the next several years.

The study appears Nov. 18 in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

While beverage companies have cut their marketing of unhealthy drinks to children on TV and websites overall, they have ramped up marketing to black and Latino kids and teens, who have higher rates of obesity than white youth, a study finds.

Measles might be preparing for a comeback tour.

Unlike Ebola, measles easily leaps between people. Virus-filled droplets linger, floating in the air or coating a coffee table for up to two hours after a contagious person coughs or sneezes. If you're susceptible to the disease and you breathe that air or touch a contaminated surface and then rub your eyes, you're screwed. Measles infects 90 percent of those who are not immune.

As children grow, they learn to crawl, to walk and then to drive. It turns out, the way they get hurt, and in particular their heads, evolves as as their forms of motion change.

Small children suffer head injuries from falling, while teenagers are at risk from car accidents, assaults and sports injuries, according to a paper published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Foods lean turkey, lower sodium cheese and whole wheat tortillas mix with local hydroponic lettuce to make wraps for elementary school students. (2013)
The U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr.com / The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Last week, the New England Journal of Medicine published an article about school lunches and nutritional “mandates” for the United States; a fascinating read.

The piece sparked a variety of conversations about whether it’s possible to provide good nutrition at a reasonable cost, without sacrificing taste (the most important factor, according to my young patients.)

Some things I heard this week….

1. “I eat square chicken (chicken nuggets) and fries every day and am f-i-n-e.”

It's generally a good idea to have the number of the poison control center handy. That's an even better plan if you have laundry detergent and small children at home.

For decades, poison centers received many calls each year about children swallowing laundry detergent or getting it in their eyes. That problem has gotten worse due to new highly concentrated single-load liquid laundry detergent packets.

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The child-mortality gap has narrowed between the poorest and wealthiest households in a majority of more than 50 developing countries, a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found.

This convergence was mostly driven by the fact that child-mortality rates declined the fastest among the poorest families. In the countries where the gap increased, the study identified a common thread: poor governance.

Why do people sometimes give generously to a cause — and other times give nothing at all?

That's a timely question, because humanitarian groups fighting the Ebola outbreak need donations from people in rich countries. But some groups say they're getting less money than they'd expect from donors despite all the news.

The Clean Plate Club

Oct 24, 2014
Brett Florence/Flickr.com

The Clean Plate club can lead to weight gain for adults and frustration for parents who want their kids to clean their plates.

“Joe says that using lavender soap can give you man boobs.’” My patient’s mother buried her head in her hands. “Joe is partially correct,” I countered. 

My patient’s mother now looked surprised. “Joe is never right about anything!”

I, however, had to disagree. It’s important to listen to patients, friends, and even your kid’s friends; it’s always educational and often there is something to be learned. Joe could be right: there are powerful endocrine disruptors all around us, which can produce adverse reproductive effects.

When Ebola began killing people in the Monrovia suburb of Clara Town several months ago, some residents blamed vaccines.

One vaccinator in the town says mothers didn't want her near their babies.

"They had a notion that when the people come to the hospital, we would inject them and kill them," says vaccinator Che Che Richardson at the Clara Town Health Center, "because it was the hospital giving the people Ebola."

Rumors like that, combined with the closing of many health facilities, have caused childhood vaccination rates to plummet in Liberia.

school lunch
Sandy Roob

Jaclyn Keifer, a registered dietician with IU Health, shares tips on packing healthy school lunches. 

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