community health

How This School Nurse Handles Work During COVID-19

Jan 8, 2021
Courtesy Of Jen BarbouRoske

The COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for Midwestern school districts as they balance their students’ education and safety. At the forefront are school nurses, who are responsible for screening kids for COVID-19, notifying parents and even contact tracing. And that’s on top of their regular duties.

PAIGE PFLEGER / WOSU

Ohio’s first transgender and gender non-conforming health and community center is a cross between a funky '80s apartment and a modern doctor’s office.

There are a few couches gathered around a TV, a kitchen, a small stage and a few exam rooms. Mikayla Robinson, the center's engagement specialist, wears a "Miss Gay Ohio" sash, which matches the brightly colored walls.

Crowded Homeless Shelters And The Vicious Flu Brew Perfect Storm

Mar 7, 2018
Carmen Heredia Rodriguez / Kaiser Health News

The flu descended on Connie Gabaldon like a fog, she recalled, clouding her mind and compromising her judgment. It progressed to chest and back pain, the aches perhaps made worse by a fall the 66-year-old had while riding the bus in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

changingaging.org

A small house and a big idea are coming to the University of Southern Indiana.

The university announced it’s building a small, modular home to demonstrate how the tiny housing model could make independent living accessible for people of all ages and abilities.


For those not familiar with Missouri, the so-called "Bootheel" refers to the wedge of the state that juts down between Tennessee and Arkansas — a area that's been profiled by Side Effect's own Bram Sable-Smith, who covered a struggling rural hospital there in 2017.

Debunking The Communion Cup Myth

Nov 17, 2017
fcor1614 / Flickr

Pastor Matt Doan of Calvary Church Santa Ana, in Southern California, pours grape juice into individual plastic cups, each about half the size of a shot glass. He fits them into deep silver trays, in preparation for the next day’s Communion.


Young, Healthy And Planning For Death

Nov 2, 2017

I’m 25. Most people my age don’t think about death, let alone how they would like to die. Except for the occasional bag of M&Ms I consume, I’m mostly healthy.


As Loyal Donors Age, Industry Is Out For Young Blood

Sep 27, 2017

When Corinne Standefer retires as a volunteer from the Lane Bloodworks in Eugene, Ore., this month, she will have donated 37 years of her life — and almost 19 gallons of blood.

The 89-year-old gave her first pint decades ago to help a friend who had cancer.

“When they called me and said ‘Could you donate again?’ I just started coming in,” she recalled.

A Dress Rehearsal For Treating Transgender Patients

Sep 14, 2017
Alex Stern / WHYY

Bianca Leigh is playing a character named Tia Lopez.

“Tia Lopez is a 36-year-old woman of trans experience. She works as a bartender. She’s in a two-year relationship with her boyfriend, and she has come for her annual physical,” Leigh explains.

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courtesy Andy Whelton

That white plume also became a focus of the research. Whelton and his team visited several sites and placed air quality monitors in and around the chemical clouds to capture samples of emissions that the professor now definitively says are “not steam.”

Welcome To The Summer Camp For Kids Affected By HIV

Jul 28, 2017
Peter Balonon-Rosen / Indiana Public Broadcasting

It’s a sleep away camp. It’s free. And once a summer the Jameson Camp in Indianapolis hosts a session for campers with this in common: Either they or a family member have HIV/AIDS.


Support Wanes As Indiana County Officials Stall On Syringe Exchange

Jul 11, 2017
OZ in OH / http://bit.ly/2tG9mHo

Tippecanoe County, Indiana received state approval for a syringe exchange in late 2016, after county health officials raised the alarm about fast-rising rates of Hepatitis C, spread by sharing needles for injection drugs. As of July 2017, it has yet to open its doors.

Women in their 40s at average risk for breast cancer should talk to their health care provider about the risks and benefits of mammography before starting regular screening at that age, according to guidelines released Thursday by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Patients With Mental Disorders Get Half Of All Opioid Prescriptions

Jun 28, 2017
Kaiser Health News

Adults with a mental illness receive more than 50 percent of the 115 million opioid prescriptions in the United States annually, according to a study released Monday. The results prompted researchers to suggest that improving pain management for people with mental health problems “is critical to reduce national dependency on opioids.”

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As Mosquito Season Warms Up, Lack Of Zika Funding Emerges As New Public Health Threat

May 30, 2017
Staff Sgt. Andrew Lee) / U.S. Air Force photo/

Zika, the mosquito-borne virus that triggered public health alarm bells last summer, has receded from the spotlight. But, experts say, expect the virus to pose a renewed threat this year.

Doctors can save thousands of lives a year if they act promptly to identify sepsis, an often lethal reaction to infection. Sometimes called blood poisoning, sepsis is the leading cause of death in hospitals.

A 4-year-old regulation in New York state compels doctors and hospitals to follow a certain protocol, involving a big dose of antibiotics and intravenous fluids. It's far from perfect — about a quarter of patients still die from sepsis. But early intervention is helping.

Lauren Chapman/WFYI

Janaya Wilkins, 25, dropped out of high school when she was a teenager. She has tried and failed to get her GED twice since then.

Now, Wilkins, a mother of two is giving high school another shot in her hometown of Indianapolis.  

And she’s getting help sticking to her goals from a life coach, whose services are paid for by an unexpected source, her health insurance company.

Trump’s Vow To Squeeze ‘Sanctuary Cities’ Could Play Havoc With Health Programs

May 2, 2017
Pixabay

 

The Trump administration’s tough stance on immigration has some local health department officials worried it could spur cuts in federal funding and complicate a wide variety of programs, from efforts to battle the opioid epidemic to domestic violence initiatives.

Hospital Companions Can Ease Isolation For Older People

Nov 21, 2016

Loneliness can be a problem for older people, especially when they're in the hospital. Their children may have moved away. Spouses and friends may themselves be too frail to visit. So a California hospital is providing volunteer companions in the geriatric unit.

One of the volunteers at the UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica is 24-year-old Julia Torrano. She hopes to go to medical school. Meanwhile, her twice-weekly volunteer shifts give her a lot of practice working with patients.

Jill Sheridan/Side Effects

The relationship between Indianapolis, in cash-strapped Marion County, and its affluent northern suburb of Carmel often draws comparisons with the famed rivalry between "Parks & Rec’s" fictional Pawnee and Eagleton.

Community-Based Care Can Reduce The Stigma Of Mental Illness

Jul 5, 2016

Mental illness has been part of human society throughout recorded history, but how we care for people with mental disorders has changed radically, and not always for the better.

In Colonial days, settlers lived in sparsely populated rural communities where sanctuary and community support enabled the tradition of family care brought from England. "Distracted persons" were acknowledged, but erratic behavior wasn't associated with disease.

Community Health Workers Reach Some Patients That Doctors Can't

Oct 29, 2015

Month after month, Natalia Pedroza showed up at the doctor's office with uncontrolled diabetes and high blood pressure. Her medications never seemed to work, and she kept returning to the emergency room in crisis.

Walfred Lopez, a Los Angeles County community health worker, was determined to figure out why.

So Long, Big Mac: Cleveland Clinic Ousts McDonald's From Cafeteria

Aug 20, 2015

One of the most prestigious names in health care is taking a stand on food.

This week, Cleveland Clinic announced it would sever ties with McDonald's. As of Sept. 18, the McDonald's branch located in the Cleveland Clinic cafeteria will turn off its fryers and close its doors for good. Its lease will not be renewed.

Dentists see patients at a free dental care event sponsored by the Indiana Dental Association. More than 1200 people attended, many of whom hadn't seen a dentist in years.
Jake Harper

Antionette Salifou is a school bus driver in Indianapolis. She recently went to a dentist because of a pain in her mouth. She was told she needed a root canal, and along with the other care she needed, it was going to cost $2000 -- way more than she can afford, since she doesn't have insurance to cover it. 

“It’s just hard to fit in there with paying bills and everything," she said.

Salifou’s problem is not uncommon. About one in three Americans lacks dental insurance, and those that have it still may not be getting the care they need.