covid-19

corgaasbeek/ Pixabay CCO

UPDATE: As the case count continues to rise, information on this story is moving quickly and may be out-of-date. We recommend checking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for ways to stay safe and this John Hopkins tool for the most recent data

As some schools close, workers are told to telecommute and the Indianapolis-based NCAA shuts down tournaments, coronavirus is having a broader impact on our lives. To answer your questions about the changes, we got some help from Tom Duszynski, an epidemiologist with the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI, and Ram Yeleti, Chief Physician Executive with Community Health Network. They   joined Indiana Public Broadcasting’s All IN on March 11.

Photo by Paige Pfleger/Side Effects Public Media.

Universities across the U.S. -- including Purdue, Indiana University, Ohio State and Iowa in the Midwest --have moved to suspend or cancel classes amid the spreading coronavirus.  This move has left some students scrambling. 

jarmoluk/Pixabay Creative Commons

It’s official: The World Health Organization says COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, is a pandemic. Government and industry leaders are moving to cancel events and stem the flow of the disease, even though some experts say it is too late. President Donald Trump announced a travel ban from European countries last night. The NBA has suspended its season and the NCAA will play tournament games -- including some scheduled for Indianapolis -- without fans. 

UPDATE: As the case count continues to rise, information on this story is moving quickly and may be out-of-date. We recommend checking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for ways to stay safe and this John Hopkins tool for the most recent data

Coronavirus cases are rising and we found many of you -- our listeners and readers -- have questions that go beyond the number of people infected with COVID-19. Questions that are tricky and complicated. Side Effects and Indiana Public Broadcasting are working to find answers, so we turned to Kara Cecil, an assistant professor of public health at the University of Indianapolis.

leo2014/Pixabay (CC0)

UPDATE: As the case count continues to rise, information on this story is moving quickly and may be out-of-date. We recommend checking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for ways to stay safe and this John Hopkins tool for the most recent data

As the number of coronavirus cases continues to tick up nationwide, local public health workers are faced with the challenging task of ensuring those at risk take proper precautions. 

Public Health Administrators Julie Pryde and Monica Hendrickson joined Illinois Public Media’s statewide talk show, “The 21st,” to discuss the impact on local public health departments -- and concerns about "inadequate" testing.


The coronavirus' impact continues to deepen with the National Guard enforcing a one-mile containment area in a New York City suburb and officials in Italy ordering a nationwide lockdown. In the U.S. Midwest, major universities are shutting their doors and pivoting to online learning. Several jails and prisons are also suspending visits amid the outbreak

Pixabay/Belova59

Cases of the novel coronavirus –– or the disease caused by the virus, COVID-19 -- continue to mount throughout the Midwest. Some states have turned to closing K-12 schools or colleges.

Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/ Alissa Eckert, MS

Coronavirus is spreading across the Midwest, and health officials are scrambling to stem the disease -- or prepare for a potential epidemic. Side Effects will keep you updated on this evolving story and share reports from partner stations across the Midwest -- including news of a school closing in Indiana and the first case in Missouri. 

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

As cases of coronavirus spread across the Midwest, we know there are lots of questions about it -- including how to avoid getting sick. We also know there's plenty of misinformation about this new virus, so we want to help you sort fact from fiction. You can follow our complete coverage of the coronavirues and COVID-19, including more Q&As.

Send your questions to health@wfyi.org or text “health” to 73224, and we'll find the answers. They will be posted regularly on Side Effects. 

Pages