covid-19

Indiana Department of Correction

Indiana prisons have seen an August spike in coronavirus infections, with 159 new cases reported since July 31. 

Reported cases of the virus trickled in throughout July: Nine people in state prisons tested positive for the disease, bringing the total to 733 cases by the end of last month. The recent surge is concentrated in two facilities. The Putnamville Correctional Facility has seen 86 cases, and the New Castle Correctional Facility has 72 new cases. As of August 13, the new total among all state prisons is 892 cases — an increase of more than 20% in two weeks.   

Wikimedia Commons

July marked 30 years since President Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act into law. And while the U.S. has come far since then, the nation still has a long way to go when it comes to achieving health equity. The current public health crisis of COVID-19 has only exacerbated existing inequities for people with disabilities. 

Courtesy of Northwestern Medicine

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, 28-year-old Mayra Ramirez was working as a paralegal for an immigration law firm in Chicago. She enjoyed walking her dogs and running 5K races. 

Ramirez has a condition requiring medication that could’ve suppressed her immune system but was otherwise healthy. When the Illinois governor issued a shelter-in-place order in March, she began working from home, hardly leaving the house. So she has no idea how she contracted COVID-19.

States continue to reopen, but the COVID-19 pandemic is far from over, according to experts on Indiana Public Broadcasting’s All IN talk show. The experts discussed the current state of the pandemic and how state officials have responded — as well as the need for more data.

¿Qué Pasa, Midwest? Season 5: Helpers In The COVID Crisis

Aug 4, 2020

¿Qué Pasa, Midwest? is a bilingual podcast for midwestern Latinx who are missing an essential piece of their cultural identity. By sharing their stories, it aims to build a sense of hope and community. Season 5 tackles the coronavirus — but not through statistics and news. This season is about the people who are finding solutions to problems caused by the pandemic.

Francisco Bonilla is a pastor in Carthage, Mo., catering to the spiritual needs of the town's growing Latinx community. But he's also a media personality, casting his voice far beyond the white-painted walls of Casa de Sanidad. Inside the church, Bonilla runs a low-power, Spanish-language radio station.

Steve Brown, WOSU

The nation’s automakers are scrambling to keep assembly lines staffed during the COVID crisis. At a Honda plant in Marysville, Ohio, that means calling on office workers to move to the line. And that has triggered anxiety among some workers.

Courtesy of Angela Kender

More than 1,200 people in Missouri have died from COVID-19. As the toll rises each day, the human aspect can get obscured. Angela Kender is looking to change that.

After losing her mother to COVID-19 in June, Kender started a project to commemorate other victims. She’s collecting their photographs at missouricovidmemorial@gmail.com. She has already has dozens of photos, and plans to show them to lawmakers at the Missouri state capitol.

You Asked: How Contact Tracing Works

Jul 31, 2020
Photo by GORDON JOHNSON/Pixabay

Experts say contact tracing is key to understanding and managing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and many community members have questions about the process. Side Effects received dozens of those questions through our partnership with Indiana Public Broadcasting. 

Indiana Department of Correction

Under COVID-19 restrictions, inmates at the Indiana Women’s Prison have spent many hours a day locked in their cells, which do not have toilets or running water and can get hotter than outside. The conditions have prompted health and fire safety concerns from advocates, politicians — even employees — especially in recent weeks as temperatures climbed.

But the prison recently took one step to help with those concerns, at least temporarily. 

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