fertility

"Sick," a new podcast from Side Effects, is examining an Indianapolis fertility doctor who made headlines -- for all the wrong reasons.

In an eight-part serial, reporters Lauren Bavis and Jake Harper explore the fertility industry and one doctor's abuse of power — as well as the mothers, fathers and children living with the consequences of his actions.

Sick is a new investigative podcast about what goes wrong in the places meant to keep us healthy. The first episode is available now, wherever you get your podcasts. 

Check Out The 'Sick' Podcast Trailer

Oct 4, 2019

Sick, a new podcast From Side Effects, examines what goes wrong in the places meant to keep us healthy.

In season one, that place is an Indianapolis fertility clinic. Reporters Lauren Bavis and Jake Harper explore the complications of the fertility industry and one doctor's abuse of power — as well as the mothers, fathers and children living with the consequences of his actions.

Updated at 8:48 p.m. ET

The birthrate fell for nearly every group of women of reproductive age in the U.S. in 2017, reflecting a sharp drop that saw the fewest newborns since 1987, according to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There were 3,853,472 births in the U.S. in 2017 — "down 2 percent from 2016 and the lowest number in 30 years," the CDC said.

fertility watch
Jim Winstead via Flickr

Conventional wisdom for couples trying to conceive is the sex that's happening while the woman is ovulating is the sex that counts. But a recent study from the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University suggests that more frequent sex during other parts of the menstrual cycle may increase the likelihood of conception, because it changes the way a woman's immune system reacts to sperm. The Indianapolis Star reports. 

Women Find A Fertility Test Isn't As Reliable As They'd Like

Oct 5, 2015

Women concerned about their fertility can use a test to help decide whether they should freeze their eggs now or whether they still have time to have a baby.

Before a couple commit time, money and emotion to the process of in vitro fertilization, they want to know one thing: What are our chances of having a baby?

Success rates vary dramatically by age. In 2013, for example, 40 percent of IVF cycles performed in women who were under the age of 35 resulted in live births, compared with 4.5 percent for women older than 42.

Melissa and her husband started trying to have a baby right after they got married. But nothing was happening. So they went to a fertility clinic and tried round after round of everything the doctors had to offer. Nothing worked.

"They basically told me, 'You know, you have no chance of getting pregnant,' " says Melissa, who asked to be identified only by her first name to protect her privacy.

But Melissa, 30, who lives in Ontario, Canada, didn't give up. She switched clinics and kept trying. She got pregnant once, but that ended in a miscarriage.

As some companies add egg freezing to their list of fertility benefits, they're touting the coverage as a family-friendly perk.

Women's health advocates say they welcome any expansion of fertility coverage. But they say that the much-publicized changes at a few high-profile companies such as Facebook and Apple are still relatively rare, even for women with serious illnesses like cancer who want to preserve their fertility.