group homes

Lauren Bavis | Side Effects Public Media

This story was updated on July 24, 2020 to include additional information on deaths in group homes.

One of the ways Mikaela Coppedge has coped during the COVID-19 pandemic has been through writing poetry. Her poem “The Fear That Is COVID-19," starts: 

“Since the coronavirus outbreak and then the quarantine beginning, life as we know has all somewhat gone to hell.” 

Coppedge has a rare brain disease called Rasmussen’s encephalitis. As a treatment, half her brain was removed when she was three years old.  

In A Room Of Their Own, Women Find A Path To Recovery

Sep 8, 2017
Courtesy Eric Okdeh

When Tanya Barie, 33, relapsed after almost a year of sobriety, she says it was a wake-up call.

"I'm tired of living a crazy life," she says. "I'm trying to do things differently with this relapse, because I'm just tired of being tired."

It wasn't Barie's first slip since she quit Percocet in 2013, but it was the first since she became a mother several months ago.

California Moves To Stop Misuse Of Psychiatric Meds In Foster Care

Sep 3, 2015

By the time DeAngelo Cortijo was 14, he had been in more than a dozen foster homes. He had run away and lived on the streets for months, and he had been diagnosed with bipolar and anxiety disorders, attachment disorder, intermittent explosive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder. He had been in and out of mental hospitals and heavily medicated.

Cortijo, who was born in San Francisco, was taken from his mother after she attempted suicide when he was 3.