health insurance

Because Of COVID-19: People Are Losing Health Insurance

Sep 3, 2020
Image via Pixabay

There are few aspects of life that have not been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Side Effects Public Media has launched a Facebook Live series called “Because of COVID-19” to examine these ripple effects and offer solutions and resources.

Our first edition looked at the way many people have lost their jobs and their employer-provided health insurance due to layoffs and business closures. 

Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

After Rebecca and Bruce Austin gave birth to their daughter, they struggled to get pregnant again. So they signed up to become foster parents.

“I wouldn’t change it for anything,” says Rebecca, reflecting on the past nine years. 


Sam Horton/Indiana Public Broadcasting.

Farmers across the Midwest are facing tight profit margins and rising healthcare costs. And that means some hold off getting medical treatment or forgo health insurance altogether. In response, some state farm bureaus are trying to fill that gap by creating their own group health plan.

Why This Free Health Clinic Is Pushing To Expand Medicaid

Dec 26, 2019
Sebastián Martínez Valdivia / Side Effects Public Media

On a chilly afternoon, Terry Cox has come to Mountain View, Mo., to see a dentist. He’s waiting on a bench outside a converted rectory.

“Came to get a tooth check and see what they got to do to it," Cox says. "Maybe get ‘em all out.”

The 56-year-old works in northern Arkansas, and drove an hour and a half to the Good Samaritan Care Clinic.

It’s open enrollment season for the health insurance marketplace established by the Affordable Care Act. But many people who need to sign up may not know it. The Trump administration has made a number of moves to diminish the law, including cuts to marketing and outreach. That creates obstacles for groups that help people sign up. 

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

new report finds the number of children without health insurance in Indiana has increased. This is the second year the state has followed this national trend.

The percentage of uninsured children in Indiana went up from 5.9 percent in 2016 to 6.6 percent in 2018. Georgetown University Center for Children and Families executive director Joan Alker, says Indiana is one of 13 states with increases this significant. 

Lindsey Moon / Side Effects Public Media

For months, Democratic presidential candidates have been swarming Iowa, seeking support for the caucuses on February 3. Healthcare -- and how to pay for it -- is one of the biggest issues for voters. More than half of the state’s hospitals are operating in the red, while per capita spending on health care is rising sharply. So what are the candidates proposing when it comes to Medicare?


Paige Pfleger, Side Effects Public Media

Holmes Co., Ohio, is a patchwork of farmland. Modest houses perch on sloping hills and laundry hangs from clothes lines, flapping in the wind. There are horses and buggies – some driven by farmers in straw hats, others by women with their hair covered in bonnets, babies on their laps.

Holmes is one of the healthiest counties in Ohio. It’s also the least insured.

Today was the start date for a federal policy that gives companies more leeway to skip insurance coverage for contraceptives. Companies can now limit coverage on moral or religious grounds -- so fewer women are likely to get coverage.

SARAH FENTEM | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

People with rare metabolic disorders need medical foods to keep from going hungry, but costs and regulations mean some go without or have to find a workaround.

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