health insurance

Governor Tom Wolf/FLICKR / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Medicaid spending on three important medications used to treat opioid addiction increased 136 percent nationwide between 2011 and 2016, according to a new report from the Urban Institute, a public policy think tank based in Washington D.C. The increases were much higher in some states—in seven states, rates rose more than 400 percent.

Sarah Fentem / Side Effects Public Media

Two of the four insurers currently offering plans on Indiana’s Affordable Care Act health insurance marketplace announced Wednesday they were pulling their plans next year, citing uncertainty surrounding the future of Obamacare and volatility in the market.

Only two health insurers will offer plans next year on Indiana’s Affordable Care Act exchange, according to proposed rate increases posted by the Indiana Department of Insurance posted Thursday. That’s down from four insurers this year and seven in 2016.

Susannah Lohr / St. Louis Public Radio

Across the country, the clock is ticking down on filing deadlines for companies who want to offer plans on the healthcare.gov marketplace. Several high-profile insurers across have announced they won't be returning to the exchange in 2018.

Indiana health insurers will file their 2018 rates this week for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace but uncertainty about the future of health care reform may play into price and availability for the roughly 150,000 Hoosiers in the system.

Beverly Knight is self-employed. She was able to have a double knee-surgery because she is covered under the ACA.  She’s worried about rate hikes.

“If President Trump’s plan to sabotage the ACA succeeds, and premiums skyrocket as many expect, hundreds of Hoosier families, including mine, will be devastated,” Knight says.

Paul Sableman / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pasa/

Three weeks after Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City, Missouri said it will pull out of the Affordable Care Act exchange in 2018, leaving 67,000 to find new coverage, another insurer has stepped up, saying it plans to offer coverage through the exchange in Missouri and Kansas.

The St. Louis-based insurer Centene already has a presence in both states administering Medicaid plans, but the move to sell individual and small group health plans is new.

GOP Health Bill Pleases Most Republicans, But Not Many Other Americans

Jun 2, 2017
Kaiser Family Foundation

The health overhaul bill passed by the House earlier this month accomplishes one major feat: It is even less popular than the not-very-popular Affordable Care Act it would largely replace, a new poll finds.

On Wednesday, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, or CBO, released an updated report outlining potential effects of the updated GOP Obamacare "repeal and replace" bill, known as the American Health Care Act. The findings indicate that over the next ten years, 23 million Americans would lose insurance under the AHCA.

That's one million fewer than the projection for the first version of the AHCA, which failed in the U.S House in March. 

Republicans Race The Clock On Health Care — But The Calendar Is Not Helping

May 22, 2017
Kaiser Health News

Back in January, Republicans boasted they would deliver a “repeal and replace” bill for the Affordable Care Act to President Donald Trump’s desk by the end of the month.

In the interim, that bravado has faded as their efforts stalled and they found out how complicated undoing a major law can be. With summer just around the corner, and most of official Washington swept up in scandals surrounding Trump, the health overhaul delays are starting to back up the rest of the 2018 agenda.

Indiana has submitted new information to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on its Medicaid expansion program, the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0. 

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