hospital

For Hospital Designers, Domke Is A Very Big Name

Jul 2, 2019
Henry Domke / Photo Provided

It's humid spring morning in the woods of central Missouri and Henry Domke is lining up a shot. His target? The vibrant petals of a red buckeye bloom.

"I want to level it. Make sure it’s really sharp," Domke says as he adjusts his tripod and focuses in before snapping the photo. 

Karen Shakerdge/WXXI

People find themselves in all kinds of unexpected situations on or leading up to Election Day — including ending up in the hospital.

Nearly half of elderly non-voters say health problems kept them from voting in the past, according to Bloomberg. But being in the hospital shouldn’t keep you from voting. People that are hospitalized in many states can cast absentee ballots from their hospital beds, including in Massachusetts, Ohio, Virginia and California.

Checking into a hospital can boost your chances of infection. That's a disturbing paradox of modern medical care.

Bob Smithson had been in the critical care unit at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston for more than a week. He had a rare neuromuscular disease, and his 78-year-old body was being kept alive by tubes that delivered air to his lungs and food to his stomach.

Then Bob's wife, Pat, got some really disturbing news. The hospital's medical staff wanted Bob to have a tracheostomy, a surgical procedure that would carve a hole in his neck and allow doctors to keep him on a breathing machine indefinitely.

Opioid Prescriptions Can Go Missing Between Hospital and Nursing Home

Dec 8, 2014

Madison, Wisconsin - Better communication between hospital and nursing home can thwart people determined to steal opioid prescriptions.

Medical Errors Drop With Improved Communication During Hospital Shift Changes

Nov 5, 2014

Improved communication among health-care providers during shift changes reduced injuries due to medical errors by 30 percent, according to a federally funded, multicenter study.

A Johns Hopkins research team reports that major hospitals across the U.S. collectively throw away at least $15 million a year in unused operating room surgical supplies that could be salvaged and used to ease critical shortages, improve surgical care and boost public health in developing countries.

Translating from one language to another is a tricky business, and when it comes to interpreting between a doctor and patient, the stakes are even higher.

Consider the story of 18-year-old baseball player Willie Ramirez.