housing

Evictions Damage Public Health. The CDC Aims To Curb Them ― For Now

8 hours ago

In August, Robert Pettigrew was working a series of odd jobs. While washing the windows of a cellphone store he saw a sign, one that he believes the "good Lord" placed there for him.

"Facing eviction?" the sign read. "You could be eligible for up to $3,000 in rent assistance. Apply today."

Shepard Community Center

When Marion County Health Commissioner Dr. Virginia Caine fell down a flight of stairs recently, a pill to treat her arthritis became a way to cope with the pain. But she forgot her insurance card on a trip to the pharmacy, and the out-of-pocket price of her prescription – $230 – gave Caine sticker shock.

Flickr

When the COVID shutdown hit, lots of people lost jobs and couldn’t pay their rent. States and cities responded by putting a moratorium on evictions, but those are ending. Housing advocates are now bracing for a flood of evictions — and a public health problem.

changingaging.org

A small house and a big idea are coming to the University of Southern Indiana.

The university announced it’s building a small, modular home to demonstrate how the tiny housing model could make independent living accessible for people of all ages and abilities.


Jennifer Nugent and her three kids are throwing a big, blue ball around in the small living room of their rental home.

The kids are happy, but Nugent isn't. She planned to raise them in a place with much more room to play.

And she was. That is, until she learned that home was uninhabitable.

Two years ago, she and her husband bought a country home in the small central Indiana town of Mooresville.

"It was blue and it had a lot of potential for us to add on," she says. "We really, really wanted that house."

California Sees Housing As Significant Investment In Health Care

Jun 4, 2015
The Star Apartments owned by the Skid Row Housing Trust is on Maple Avenue and 6th Street in Los Angeles, Calif.
Heidi de Marco / KHN

LOS ANGELES — Will Nebbitt lives on the 5th floor of a new downtown apartment building. From his window, he has a panoramic view of the Los Angeles skyline. He can also see Skid Row, where he spent decades sleeping on the ground.

Nebbitt, 58, says his body can’t handle life outside anymore. He has a seizure disorder, heart disease and depression. He’s had four operations, including bypass surgery on his leg in March.

“I am too old and sick to be back out there on the streets,” he said. “It kind of takes a toll on a person.”