immigrant health

La necesidad de trabajar supera las COVID preocupaciones para migrantes

Oct 29, 2020
Dana Cronin/Illinois Newsroom

Read this article in English here.

RANTOUL – En las afueras de Rantoul, en el centro-este de Illinois, unos 100 trabajadores agrícolas migrantes están viviendo en un viejo hotel localizado en una parte tranquila de la ciudad.

courtesy of Kelly Harper Berkson

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, Side Effects is answering questions from our audience about the virus. To reach a larger audience, we’ve translated some of this material into Spanish. And now, we're partnering with Indiana University linguistics professor Kelly Harper Berkson and the Chin Languages Research Project to provide information to the Burmese-American community. 

courtesy of Kelly Harper Berkson

courtesy of Kelly Harper Berkson

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, Side Effects is answering questions from our audience about the virus. To reach a larger audience, we've partnered with Indiana University linguistics professor Kelly Harper Berkson and the Chin Languages Research Project to provide information to the Burmese-American community.

courtesy of Kelly Harper Berkson

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, Side Effects is answering questions from our audience about the virus. To reach a larger audience, we've partnered with Indiana University linguistics professor Kelly Harper Berkson and the Chin Languages Research Project to provide information to the Burmese-American community.

courtesy of Kelly Harper Berkson

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, Side Effects is answering questions from our audience about the virus. We're partnering with Indiana University linguistics professor Kelly Harper Berkson and the Chin Languages Research Project to provide information to the Burmese-American community. IU students Peng Hlei Thang and Kimberly Sakhong provided the translation.

Ahodah hneksaknak aa tuah kho?

Natalie Krebs / Side Effects Public Media

Figuring out America’s healthcare system can be hard for anyone. It can be especially challenging for refugees, who often face significant language and cultural barriers. But one group is trying to bridge that gap by training refugees as health navigators in their own communities.


Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

Across the United States, there’s a push to give new doctors cultural training to work with refugees and other immigrants. And some say it’s the difference between healthy and sick patients.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Deepa Halaharvi is a morning person.

"Eat, read, pray, and get ready to go to work," she says, laughing. "And usually I’m out the door around 6:15 or 6:30."

Who Are Refugees And Immigrants?

Apr 23, 2019

Throughout 2019, Side Effects will examine the health care challenges that refugees and immigrants face in the United States. Language barriers, cultural misunderstandings and our complex bureaucracy can interfere with effective care.

Who is a refugee?

A refugee is someone forced to flee their country because of persecution, war or violence. The persecution can be due to race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group.

Sebastián Martínez Valdivia/Side Effects Public Media

At a pediatric clinic in Kirksville, Mo., a young boy is waiting in an exam room to be vaccinated. A nurse explains the shots to his mother, and Lisette Chibanvunya translates.

Lauren Bavis/Side Effects Public Media

Kazito Kalima was 14 at the start of the Rwandan genocide. Over just a few months in 1994, hundreds of thousands of Tutsi people in his country were killed, including most of his family.

Casa De Salud / https://www.facebook.com/casadesalud/

Several parts of the country have only a quarter or less than the mental health professionals they need, according to the federal Health Resources and Services Administration. That means it can take months to receive treatment.

Understanding The History Behind Communities' Vaccine Fears

May 5, 2017

All four of Anab Gulaid's children have received their vaccinations on the recommended schedule. As Somali-American residents of Minneapolis, that puts them in the minority.

Fewer than half of Minnesota children of Somali descent have received the MMR shot that protects against measles, mumps and rubella, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Health, which is now working to combat a growing measles outbreak in the Twin Cities.

For Immigrant Families, Mix Of Status And Low Income Makes Staying Healthy A Struggle

Jul 9, 2016
Mary Wiltenburg / For KHN

Some days, in the busy East Baltimore insurance agency where she works, saleswoman Nathaly Uribe takes nonstop calls from members of the city’s Latino community, looking to buy home and car protection plans. It’s an unspoken irony that the women in her office, who spend eight hours a day insuring others, don’t have health insurance themselves.

When The Cost Of Care Triggers A Medical Deportation

Apr 13, 2016

In an emergency, hospitals, by law, must treat any patient in the U.S. until he or she is stabilized, regardless of the patient's immigration status or ability to pay.

Yet, when it comes time for the hospitals to discharge these patients, the same standard doesn't apply.

Though hospitals are legally obligated to find suitable places to discharge patients (for example, to their homes, rehabilitation facilities or nursing homes), their insurance status makes all the difference.

Martin Machain has his eyes examined in a doctor's office.
Sonia Narang

When Martin Machain arrived to Los Angeles from Mexico years ago, he didn’t know where to turn for health care. Machain migrated to the US to escape poverty and change his life. But without insurance, it hasn’t been easy.


Rebecca Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

Laldin Liana, a recently-arrived refugee, sits in his doctor’s office in Columbia, Missouri, talking about his life – his favorite Jason Statham movies, life in Myanmar and his three children. He’s speaking with two nursing students from the University of Missouri, who are here to help him navigate his appointment.

Latinos Live Longer, Despite Poverty. What's Their Secret?

Dec 11, 2015
Acavius Largo/YES! Magazine

Celia Aguilar wears a long, loosely fitted white dress with touches of red embroidery and red bandanas tied around her head and waist. The 29-year-old Chicana dances alongside men wearing large, feathered headdresses, the seashells on their ankles rattling. Here in El Paso, Texas, they gather in a ritual of Danza Azteca, an Aztec dance preserved in Mexican culture. 

Shutterstock

Raucous laughter fills a small communal kitchen as ten men shout and joke with each other in Spanish after a long day of picking apples on an orchard in Orleans County in Western New York.

They’re playing a game of charades. But instead of pantomiming movie titles or celebrities, the men are acting out symptoms of acute pesticide exposure, which include things like rashes, headaches, vomiting, and eye irritation.

As Latinos Age, the Need for Spanish-Speaking Caretakers Grows

Nov 10, 2015
Eilis O’Neill

Luis and Miriam Sierra are originally from Colombia, but they’ve lived in New York City for decades. About ten years ago, Miriam began to show symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

It’s necessary to help her with everything: bathing her, dressing her, feeding her,” said her husband,  Luis Sierra. “It’s very hard.”

Community Health Workers Reach Some Patients That Doctors Can't

Oct 29, 2015

Month after month, Natalia Pedroza showed up at the doctor's office with uncontrolled diabetes and high blood pressure. Her medications never seemed to work, and she kept returning to the emergency room in crisis.

Walfred Lopez, a Los Angeles County community health worker, was determined to figure out why.

A California county voted Tuesday to restore primary health care services to undocumented adults living in the county.

Contra Costa County, east of San Francisco, joins 46 other California counties that have agreed to provide non-emergency care to immigrants who entered the country illegally.

The Debate Issue That Wasn't: Obamacare

Doesn't it seem like just yesterday that Congressional Republicans shut down the federal government to protest funding the ACA? Ok, it was two years ago. But it's still remarkable that the healthcare law barely came up during Wednesday night's GOP debateVox's Sarah Kliff says that silence says a lot

Hispanic people much are less likely to get cancer than non-Hispanic whites, but it's also their leading cause of death.

Beneath that puzzling fact lie the complexities and contradictions of the Hispanic health experience in the United States. Since we're talking about 17 percent of the U.S. population, it has ramifications for health care and the economy.

Here's what caught our eye in Wednesday's report on cancer and Hispanics from the American Cancer Society:

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