Latino health

At a news conference on Aug. 26, Indiana State Health Commissioner Dr. Kris Box said it’s crucial for Hoosiers to participate in contact tracing.  

“So If you get a text or a phone call from the state department of health about an important public health matter, please answer the text, answer the call,” she said.  

¿Qué Pasa, Midwest? Season 5: Helpers In The COVID Crisis

Aug 4, 2020

¿Qué Pasa, Midwest? is a bilingual podcast for midwestern Latinx who are missing an essential piece of their cultural identity. By sharing their stories, it aims to build a sense of hope and community. Season 5 tackles the coronavirus — but not through statistics and news. This season is about the people who are finding solutions to problems caused by the pandemic.

Francisco Bonilla is a pastor in Carthage, Mo., catering to the spiritual needs of the town's growing Latinx community. But he's also a media personality, casting his voice far beyond the white-painted walls of Casa de Sanidad. Inside the church, Bonilla runs a low-power, Spanish-language radio station.

Sebastián Martínez Valdivia / Side Effects Public Media

Glenda Cervantes’s work at the Saline County Health Department usually involves helping people see if they qualify for social services. But for the last two months she’s been responding to the local COVID-19 outbreak instead. “I still remember the day they said we got our first positive and we’re going to need someone’s help," she says.

Why Latinos Are Less Likely To Seek Healthcare

Dec 20, 2019
Photo by Annacaroline Caruso/Side Effects

Hispanics are the least likely racial and ethnic group to see a doctor when they have health problems. That’s according to a study by the Census Bureau. There are several barriers that discourage some from that community from seeking medical attention in the U.S.

Hispanic Men Often Put Off Medical Care, Bringing Bigger Trouble

Apr 27, 2017

Peter Uribe left Chile at 21 with his wife and 2-year-old daughter, landing in Baltimore and finding steady work in construction. His social life revolved around futbol, playing "six or seven nights a week in soccer tournaments," he says.

A couple of years after his arrival, he broke his foot during a game and afraid of the cost, didn't seek medical care.

Foods made with corn masa flour — like tortillas, tacos and tamales — could soon play a critical role in the health of babies born to Latina mothers in the U.S.

That's because, as of today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is now allowing manufacturers to fortify their corn masa foods with folic acid. That's a synthetic form of folate, a B vitamin that helps prevent severe defects of the brain and spinal cord when consumed by women before and early in pregnancy.

Playing Out The Impact Of More Children Being Insured

Jan 18, 2016
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D Gorenstein

A new report out Thursday morning from Georgetown University and the group La Raza has found in 2014, some 300,000 Latino children got health insurance, dropping the uninsured rate to less than 10 percent, thanks in part to healthcare law known as Obamacare.

It turns out getting children on Medicaid — even healthy kids — matters more than you might think. Georgetown’s Sonya Schwartz said it’s a kind of golden ticket.

Advocates Allege Discrimination In California’s Medicaid Program

Dec 16, 2015

LOS ANGELES – A coalition of civil rights advocates Tuesday called for a federal investigation of California’s Medicaid program, alleging that it discriminates against millions of low-income Latinos by denying them equal access to health care.

This story was originally published by Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit national health policy news service. 

Latinos Live Longer, Despite Poverty. What's Their Secret?

Dec 11, 2015
Acavius Largo/YES! Magazine

Celia Aguilar wears a long, loosely fitted white dress with touches of red embroidery and red bandanas tied around her head and waist. The 29-year-old Chicana dances alongside men wearing large, feathered headdresses, the seashells on their ankles rattling. Here in El Paso, Texas, they gather in a ritual of Danza Azteca, an Aztec dance preserved in Mexican culture. 

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