maternal mortaility

Missouri Birth Village Offers Black Mothers A Safe Space, Trust And Support

19 hours ago
KAE PETRIN / ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Brittany "Tru" Kellman sometimes starts her day two hours before Jamaa Birth Village opens at 10 a.m., stashing diapers and snacks for the dozens of people who will come through the Ferguson nonprofit’s doors. She gives everyone a hug when she meets them.

Jamaa is different from other pregnancy clinics. It provides care for women of color by women of color. After traumatic experiences as a teen mom, Kellman was determined to create a better alternative for black women.

Daniel Reche/Pixabay

In another step to lower its high maternal death rate, Indiana has joined the Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health.

The alliance is a national group of public health organizations and hospitals that works to reduce poor birth outcomes. It analyzes hospital data and provides training materials on addressing health complications during pregnancy.

Lauren Bavis/Side Effects Public Media

Melody Lynch-Kimery had a fairly routine pregnancy. But when she got to the hospital for delivery, she says things quickly turned dangerous.

On Tuesday, a panel of experts tackled the subject of maternal and infant mortality -- and the unequal burden on African-Americans in Indiana. They dove into a wide range of issues -- from low breast-feeding rates to the implicit bias of some doctors -- and shared some grim statistics.   

Side Effects Public Media

On Tuesday, Dec. 11, Side Effects Public Media, the Indianapolis Recorder and the Indiana Minority Health Coalition hosted a conversation on how maternal and infant mortality disproportionately impacts communities of color in Indiana. 

The panel discussion, moderated by Indianapolis Recorder Editor Oseye Boyd, included Dr. Kristina Box, state health commissioner for the Indiana Department of Health; Bianca Wilson-Gillespie, a mother, advocate and doula in training; Dr. Indy Lane, an obstetrician-gynecologist with Community Health Network; and Ashley Rainey, a nurse and clinical educator in labor and delivery.

Giving Birth In Indiana Can Be Dangerous. It's Worse If You're Black

Dec 7, 2018
Lauren Bavis/Side Effects Public Media

Ceera Moseby is a first-time mom and due early next year. Her pregnancy has been smooth so far. Still, the young, healthy Indianapolis woman has cause for concern.

“Me being a black woman, I am higher risk for death in that hospital," the 20-year-old said.

Rural Hoosiers Face Long Drives To Reach Prenatal Care

Oct 23, 2018
Zach Herndon, WFIU/WTIU News

Indiana’s maternal and infant mortality rates are far higher than the national average. Experts say one of the reasons is a lack of access to care providers. 

It’s a problem statewide, but it's especially felt in rural areas.

Driving Hours To Reach OB Care 

Deidra Firestone is expecting a child this year. This time, she says she’s blessed with a ‘normal pregnancy.’ But last year, she wasn't so lucky.

Lauren Bavis / Side Effects Public Media

Courtney Reimlinger was breastfeeding her week-old son last year when she felt a pain in her chest.

The pain was excruciating, the 23-year-old Indianapolis native remembers, much worse than the 10 hours in labor she'd spent a week before. It spread up her neck and into her head, and soon she was slipping in and out of consciousness.

Officials and activists from around the world gathered in New York this week to mark the 20th anniversary of the landmark 1995 World Conference on Women.

Although there were a lot of depressing statistics discussed at the current meeting, there was one piece of good news that many kept citing as reason for hope: Since 1995 the rate of women worldwide who die in childbirth has dropped by more than 40 percent.