Medicaid

News and updates about Medicaid.

Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

In a week when federal health policy is dominating the headlines, Indiana is also looking to make some unusual changes to its Medicaid program.

Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

This week, Missouri transferred the state-run health coverage of about 240,000 low-income adults and children to managed care plans run by three companies: WellCare, Centene Corporation and United Health Group.

Lauren Chapman/WFYI

Janaya Wilkins, 25, dropped out of high school when she was a teenager. She has tried and failed to get her GED twice since then.

Now, Wilkins, a mother of two is giving high school another shot in her hometown of Indianapolis.  

And she’s getting help sticking to her goals from a life coach, whose services are paid for by an unexpected source, her health insurance company.

Bram Sable-Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

Six years ago, 53-year-old Corla Morgan noticed blisters forming on her neck and back.

“I couldn’t sleep because when I took my shirt off, if my shirt touched my skin, the skin just peeled off,” Morgan says. “I was in really horrible pain.”

Karen Shakerdge/WXXI

Mary Rivera knew something wasn’t right, but she still didn’t go to the doctor. 

“I knew that my uterus wasn’t where it should've been, but I didn’t have any insurance at the time. To go to the hospital and have an operation seemed impossible,” Rivera said from her home in Manchester, New York.

Screenshot/Department of Health and Human Services

  Darvin Bentlage says his health insurance plan used to be the same as all the other cattle farmers in Barton County, Mo.: Stay healthy until he turned 65, then get on Medicare. But when he turned 50, things did not go according to plan.

Experts Weigh Indiana's Medicaid Fate Under Proposed GOP ACA Replacement

Mar 8, 2017
Washington State House Republicans/via Flickr

The House Republicans’ replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act—otherwise known as Obamacare—would gradually phase out enrollment in Medicaid expansion programs such as Indiana’s Healthy Indiana Plan.

Bram Sable-Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

This story has been updated on March 7, 2017.

Missouri State Senator David Sater is looking for ways to reduce the amount of money his state spends on Medicaid, because, as he sees it, “the Medicaid program is eating out lunch right now.”

His idea? To voluntarily cap the amount of Medicaid funding coming from the federal government. 


Note: This story was updated at 11 p.m. February 22, 2017. 

The federal government is welcoming public comment on an application to renew Indiana’s Medicaid program until March 17. The program needs federal approval to continue because its design is an experiment: Unlike Medicaid expansions in other states, the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0, requires members to make monthly payments. Now Indiana has to argue that the experiment is working.

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