medical marijuana

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Since February, patients in Illinois have been able to swap their opioid prescriptions for marijuana. And many are doing just that.

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Across the country, states desperate to prevent opioid addiction are increasingly looking to medical cannabis as a solution. Lawmakers in several states, including New York, Indiana, Georgia and Tennessee, have taken action to initiate or expand their medical marijuana programs to try and address the opioid crisis.

Illinois is trying to do the same.

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Thirty U.S. states have enacted medical cannabis laws, and all but one of them include cancer in the list of conditions allowed. Such laws give cancer patients across the country access to a substance that remains illegal under federal law. Anecdotal reports suggest it’s helpful in managing symptoms of chemotherapy, like pain and nausea.

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Across the country, states desperate to prevent opioid addiction are considering medical cannabis as a solution.

Citing the opioid crisis, lawmakers in several states are looking to initiate or expand their medical marijuana programs including KentuckyNew YorkNew Jersey and Indiana. And in Illinois, where opioids have claimed nearly 11,000 lives over the past decade, the legislature is considering a measure that would allow patients with an opioid prescription to get access to marijuana instead.


Recent scientific reviews have found substantial evidence that marijuana can be useful in easing at least some types of chronic pain. Yet even for the majority of Americans who live in states that have legalized medical marijuana, choosing opioids can be much cheaper.

Indiana Gov: Stores Have Two Months To Clear CBD Oil From Shelves

Nov 29, 2017
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Governor Eric Holcomb is directing Indiana Excise Police to issue warnings to stores selling cannabidiol, or CBD, for the next 60 days.

State AG Deems Cannabidiol Illegal Except for Epilepsy Patients

Nov 22, 2017
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A decision from Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill regarding cannabidiol, or CBD oil, could impact those who already use the hemp-derived extract for pain relief or other medical benefits.

Indiana Officials Line Up Against Medical Marijuana

Nov 14, 2017
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Despite a push from some Indiana legislators to legalize marijuana as an alternative to opioid pain medications, government officials — including the state’s governor himself — say they won’t support efforts to legalize medical pot.

On an afternoon in August at the Indiana State Library, a stately limestone building usually home to genealogy conventions or history lectures, the Indiana chapter of The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, or NORML, laid out a very distinctive welcome mat emblazoned with a familiar leafy plant.


American Legion Of Indiana Wants Medical Marijuana Legalized To Ease Vet Pain

Jan 16, 2017
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The American Legion of Indiana passed a resolution Sunday calling on Congress to recognize marijuana as a drug with medical value and asking Indiana legislatures to develop a medical marijuana program.

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Now that Florida voters have passed a medical marijuana constitutional amendment, some are already asking: Is recreational marijuana next?

High out-of-pocket costs may prove to be an insurmountable obstacle for patients seeking medical marijuana. While the treatment has been legalized, the state has not set a price for it, and insurance companies will not be covering it.

As a result, people like Angel won't have access.

"My story is a long story."

Is marijuana really an effective drug? Surprisingly, scientists have no solid answer

Jul 19, 2015

One would think that with medical marijuana now legal in 23 states, the science to support its efficacy would be fairly definitive. Surprisingly, that's not the case.

Despite the fierce political tussles and competing medical claims the truth is this: Very little solid scientific evidence exists to either confirm or dispute marijuana’s effectiveness as a drug or its potential for harm.

People who buy medical marijuana products might not be getting what they paid for, a study finds. And evidence remains elusive on benefits for most medical conditions, even though almost half the states have legalized medical marijuana.

Recreational marijuana has been legalized in four states, but that doesn't mean it's a tested consumer product. Some of those potent buds are covered in fungus while others contain traces of butane, according to an analysis of marijuana in Colorado.

There's a lot of argument over how teenage marijuana use might affect people through life, but distressingly little data to help figure it out. That leaves parents, policymakers and young people pretty much in the dark when it comes to making decisions about use and legalization.

Three long-running studies of teenagers and young adults in Australia and New Zealand might help. An analysis of the studies found a dose-response relationship: The more someone smoked pot as a teenager, the more likely that person would struggle as a young adult.

Johns Hopkins University

In states where it is legal to use medical marijuana to manage chronic pain and other conditions, the annual number of deaths from prescription drug overdose is 25 percent lower than in states where medical marijuana remains illegal, new research suggests.

Lots of people are making money off marijuana sales. Officials in San Bernardino, a Southern California city that filed for bankruptcy in 2012, are suggesting that it might as well profit too.

Officials are considering a proposal floated by City Attorney Gary Saenz to regulate and tax medical marijuana dispensaries.

Earlier this week, a bipartisan bill was introduced in Congress that would legalize a certain compound in marijuana for medical purposes.

That came just a day after The New York Times editorial board called for an end to the federal ban on marijuana use and sales, lending some high-level support to the industry.

A Look At How Marijuana Affects Health

Jul 28, 2014
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 This summer, New York has become the 23rd state to legalize medical marijuana. The new law won't take effect for 18 months. And when it does, the measure puts very tight limits on how the marijuana can be administered: by pill or vapor, but not smoked. There are just ten illnesses that qualify for a prescription for medical marijuana. Serious conditions, such as Cancer, HIV, Parkinson's, and ALS. Dr. J. Michael Bostwick is a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic. He spoke with Barbara Lewis about his recent major paper on the health effects of medical marijuana.  Listen to the full interview or find highlights below.


Stat: Marijuana

Jul 25, 2014
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In a recent study of high school seniors, 10 percent of those who had never used marijuana said they would start using it. 

Twenty-two states and the District of Columbia now have laws allowing for some form of medical marijuana.

Florida appears poised to join the club. Polls show that voters there are likely to approve a November ballot measure legalizing marijuana for medical use.

If it passes, regulations that would set up a market for medical marijuana in Florida are still at least a year away. But cannabis entrepreneurs from around the country are already setting up shop in the state.