medical school

New Doctors Prepare For Residency Amid COVID-19 Crisis

Apr 10, 2020
Courtesy of Lauren Grant

For fourth-year medical students, spring is normally the time for an important rite of passage. They finish  classes and find out where they’ll spend the next several years doing their residencies.

The coronavirus pandemic has turned all that upside down.

Sebastián Martínez Valdivia / Side Effects Public Media

On a sunny afternoon in Sedalia, Mo., a town between St. Louis and Kansas City, Jennifer and Matt Boatright escorted some unusual visitors into a pasture on their farm. They opened the heavy gate and called their sheep over to meet a half-dozen medical students from the University of Missouri system. 

The farm tour was part of a week-long program designed to introduce future doctors, pharmacists and nurses to rural life.  The goal: Get the students interested in working in rural areas.


Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

Across the United States, there’s a push to give new doctors cultural training to work with refugees and other immigrants. And some say it’s the difference between healthy and sick patients.

Indiana Med School Move Creates New Opportunities

Jan 30, 2019
Isaiah Seibert/Side Effects Public Media

The Indiana University School of Medicine’s (IUSM) Evansville campus has a new home.

Once located on the campus of the University of Southern Indiana, the med school moved late last year to downtown Evansville. 

Side Effects asked Dr. Steven Becker, the school’s director and associate dean, about the move – and his plans.

Why Don't Young Doctors Want To Work In Primary Care?

Jun 24, 2016
Stanford Geriatric Education Center via Youtube

In the world of physicians, there are hundreds of specialties—neurologists, orthopedic surgeons, dermatologists, radiologists, anesthesiologists...all the different "ologists." But doctors generally fall into two camps: the specialists and the generalists, like, for example, your family doctor. As it turns out, there's a longstanding struggle between these two camps, and a lot of people would say primary care is losing.

As a first-year resident, I found myself wanting to understand why.

NYCMarines via Flickr

Veterans Day is when America stops to thank those who have sacrificed to keep the country safe and free. This year, gratitude for their service includes a significant step to help keep them healthier.

Greek vase with a depiction of a doctor treating a patient.
Marie-Lan Nguyen via Wikimedia Commons / Louvre Museum

You don't expect to see classes like fiction writing, drawing and drama in a medical school curriculum. But some of the county's top med schools are integrating arts and humanities classes in an attempt to build empathy for the patient experience of  illness, as Stat News reports. 

Oviea Akpotaire and Jeffrey Okonye put in long days working with patients at the veterans' hospital in south Dallas as fourth-year medical students at the University of Texas Southwestern.

They're in a class of 237 people and they're two of only five black men in their class.

"I knew the ones above us, below us," Okonye says. "We all kind of know each other. It's comforting to see another person that looks like you."

There’s a serious doctor shortage in the United States and the problem is set to get worse if medical schools don't increase the number of physicians they train.

According to a 2015 report prepared for the ​Association of American Medical Colleges, the demand for physicians-- especially primary care doctors--is growing faster than the supply. The analysis projects there will be a shortage of 46,100 to 90,400 physicians by 2025. 

saiah Roggow, a third-year medical student at the University of California, Riverside, examines patient Becky Ketchum during the school’s free clinic.
Rebecca Plevin / KPCC

Time for a pop quiz: When it comes to health care, what’s the difference between cost, charge and payment?

“Does anyone want to take a stab at it?” Sara-Megumi Naylor asks a group of first-year residents at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

This story is part of a collaboration that includes KPCC, NPR and Kaiser Health News

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