obesity

Clint Lalonde / https://www.flickr.com/photos/clint_lalonde/

Findings from a new study on fast food availability appear to turn previous research on its head.

New research published Monday adds fuel to an ongoing debate in the public health community over whether a few extra pounds are good, or bad, for you.

Earlier research found that being somewhat overweight, but not obese, may result in a longer life.

One Weight-Loss Solution Fits All? Nope.

Dec 22, 2016
Gemma Billings/via Flickr

Why do some people lose weight on a certain diet but others lose hardly anything? 

For some researchers, that question is informing how they tailor fitness and weight-loss programs for each individual. 

One of the fundamental ways scientists measure the well-being of a nation is tracking the rate at which its citizens die and how long they can be expected to live.

So the news out of the federal government Thursday is disturbing: The overall U.S. death rate has increased for the first time in a decade, according to an analysis of the latest data. And that led to a drop in overall life expectancy for the first time since 1993, particularly among people younger than 65.

Promotional Video / MU Health

Every year, the US Census Bureau and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention administer the National Health Interview Survey to help track the health of the various demographic groups that make up the county's population. But it wasn’t until 2013 that the survey included questions about sexual orientation.

One finding that emerged was that lesbian and bisexual women are more likely to be obese than their heterosexual counterparts. Jane McElroy, associate professor of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Missouri-Columbia, is the first to publish research on interventions to specifically address the issue. Her study was published in the July issue of Women’s Health Issues, and she came by our studios to discuss her findings.


Jake Harper/Side Effects

On a hot day, some adults have taken a group of kids to explore the neighborhood around their school, SENSE — the Southeast Neighborhood School of Excellence, a K-8 charter school in Indianapolis. They’ve left the school’s air-conditioned cafeteria to perform a walk audit.


Every year, the US Census Bureau and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention administer the National Health Interview Survey to help track the health of the various demographic groups that make up the county's population. But it wasn’t until 2013 that the survey included questions about sexual orientation.

One finding that emerged was that lesbian and bisexual women are more likely to be obese than their heterosexual counterparts. Jane McElroy, associate professor of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Missouri-Columbia, is the first to publish research on interventions to specifically address the issue. Her study was published in the current issue of Women’s Health Issues, and she came by the KBIA studios to discuss her findings.


Strokes On The Rise Among Younger Adults

Feb 22, 2016

"I am what I like to call 'new stroke'," says Troy Hodge, a 43-year-old resident of Carroll County, Md. With a carefully trimmed beard and rectangular hipster glasses, Hodge looks spry. But two years ago, his brain stopped communicating for a time with the left half of his body.

Combined Effects Of Maternal Obesity, Diabetes ‘Substantially’ Raise Autism Risks

Feb 1, 2016

While the incidence of autism spectrum disorder has increased in recent years, what’s behind it remains relatively mysterious and even controversial. But a major study could shed new light on some of the maternal health factors that may increase children’s risk of developing the condition.

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by difficulties with communication and social interaction as well as repetitive or obsessive behaviors. The range and severity of symptoms can vary widely.

A laparoscopic adjustable gastric band, commonly called a lap-band LAGB, is an inflatable silicone device placed around the top portion of the stomach to treat obesity, intended to slow consumption of food and thus reduce the amount of food consumed. Dr.
Blausen.com staff / Wikiversity Journal of Medicine

In the latest issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, editor Fiona Clement reviewed the latest information on surgeries, devices and drugs for the treatment of obesity. She considered the options not just for doctors and the public, but for herself: she is 5-foot-10 and weights 230 pounds. Clement concluded the risks for each treatment outweigh the benefits writing "I'm off to the gym." WBUR's Commonhealth interviewed Clement to discuss these treatments and her difficult decision to write about her own struggle with obesity. Read the interview here: 

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