prenatal care

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New mom Briante Melton of Indianapolis met her best friend at her lowest moment.

“I just felt kind of like hopeless,” she said. “Like I was going to feel like that forever.”

After her one-year-old son Isaiah was born, she says she suffered post-partum depression. When she didn’t always feel like getting outdoors, help came to her inside her own home through the Nurse Family Partnership at Goodwill Industries.

MICHELLE LEE/CREATIVE COMMONS

A bipartisan group of legislators and advocates are urging passage of a bill that would allow all pregnant women in Connecticut access to insurance coverage for pre- and post-natal care.

Gaps In Women’s Health Care May Derail Zika Prevention In Texas, Florida

Jun 14, 2016
Mosquitoes bearing Zika — a virus that can cause birth defects when contracted by pregnant women — are expected to reach the United States as soon as this summer, with Florida and Texas likely to be among the hardest-hit states. But in both, support for w
CDC Global via Flickr

Mosquitoes bearing Zika — a virus that can cause birth defects when contracted by pregnant women — are expected to reach the United States as soon as this summer, with Florida and Texas likely to be among the hardest-hit states.

But in both, support for women’s health care, along with family planning resources, has been dramatically scaled back, in part because of funding restrictions placed on women’s clinics that, in addition to other services, provide abortions. Also, both states declined to expand Medicaid. Those decisions, many advocates say, are putting a squeeze on the health care system’s ability to educate women about Zika’s risks and minimize its impact.

In LA, Moms-To-Be Share Appointments

May 13, 2016
Anjik Butler and Alexandria Smith share their pregnancy concerns during a group session at the Eisner’s Women’s Health Center in Los Angeles. Shared medical appointments are becoming more common as a way to cut costs and improve efficiency.
Heidi de Marco / KHN

LOS ANGELES — The women sat in a circle and bemoaned their sleepless nights. It seemed unfair: Their babies weren’t even born yet.

Mayra Del Real’s daughter turned somersaults in her belly every few hours. Alexandria Smith lay awake with heartburn. When she wasn’t propped up with every pillow in the house, she was making bleary-eyed trips to the bathroom.

Sofia Mejia, pregnant with her third baby, laughed knowingly.

“It’s really priceless — those moments in the middle of the night,” she said. “You get used to it.”

These moms-to-be weren’t just commiserating over coffee. They were at a routine prenatal visit — all five of them at once.

Lack Of Local Prenatal Care Forces Tough Choices For Rural Florida Women

Nov 10, 2015
The rate of women giving birth without ever seeing a doctor more than doubled in Dixie County, Florida  after the health department stopped offering prenatal care.
WMFE

 

There is a seven-county stretch in North Central Florida –an area larger than Puerto Rico –where over the past two years every county health department stopped offering prenatal care.

Since then, the rate of women getting in to see a doctor in the first trimester has dropped in all seven counties.

The Indiana State Department of Health promotes safe sleep habits as part of its efforts to reduce infant mortality.
Daniel Rothamel via Flickr/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Indiana is focusing resources on some of the state’s most vulnerable communities to address a major health inequity. Earlier this month, Governor Mike Pence signed legislation to authorize $13.5 million over the next two years to a grant program aimed at reducing infant mortality, a problem which disproportionately affects African Americans.