Uninsured

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

new report finds the number of children without health insurance in Indiana has increased. This is the second year the state has followed this national trend.

The percentage of uninsured children in Indiana went up from 5.9 percent in 2016 to 6.6 percent in 2018. Georgetown University Center for Children and Families executive director Joan Alker, says Indiana is one of 13 states with increases this significant. 

David Sanford, CEO of Wichita-based GraceMed, says health centers that serve Kansans who lack insurance or have trouble paying for health care are seeing growing demand for their services.
Bryan Thompson / Heartland Health Monitor

Health centers that serve Kansans who lack insurance or struggle to pay for primary health care are seeing no lack of demand for their services.

Rebecca Lewis of McPherson, a small town in the center of the state, was once a part of that group. In 2011, Lewis found herself working three part-time jobs and trying to complete a college degree. As a single mom with three young boys — then ages 8, 5 and 2 — it was hard to make ends meet.

Weeks before school started last week in the Kansas City suburb of Olathe, Kansas, the town’s school district began its annual effort to get low-income students signed up for dental checkups. Each year, when parents register at the elementary schools that serve the district’s poorest students, they are asked whether their children have a dentist. “And if they say no, we say, ‘We have a program in our school—a dentist is coming to our school this year,’” explains health services director Cynthia Galemore.

Talk about sticker shock: Some U.S. hospitals charge patients more than 10 times the rates paid by Medicare.

Of the 50 U.S. hospitals with the highest charges, 49 are for-profit institutions, 20 operate in Florida, and half are owned by a single chain, according to a study published in the journal Health Affairs Monday.

Medical Students Jump In To Help The Uninsured

Apr 7, 2015

At an Institute for Family Health center near Union Square in New York City, medical student Sara Stream asks a new patient named Alicia what brings her in. The 34-year-old woman arrived last summer from Guatemala, and says she hasn't been seen by a doctor in many years.

Her list of ailments is long.

"I have trouble seeing, headaches, problems with my stomach," says Alicia, who declined to use her full name, because she is in the country illegally. "I feel depressed."

A total of 16.4 million non-elderly adults have gained health insurance coverage since the Affordable Care Act became law five years ago this month. It's a reduction in the ranks of the uninsured the the Department of Health and Human Services called historic.