vaping

Natalie Krebs / Side Effects Public Media

The federal government recently raised the smoking age to 21 to help curb teen vaping.  Some are applauding the decision as a win for public health. Others worry it was a knee-jerk reaction.

An "open tank" e-cigarettes sits on the counter at Mason Odle's vape store, Just Vapor. These larger, open tank systems are exempt from FDA regulations on flavors.
Photo by Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

Just a few weeks ago, some Midwest state legislatures were aiming to raise the legal age for smoking. But Congress moved first, setting a new national age limit of 21. Now, some anti-smoking advocates say that’s not enough. 

Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media

A wide range of healthcare issues drew headlines in 2019, affecting the lives of millions of Americans. Here are some highlights from Side Effects Public Media's coverage across the Midwest:

Vaping. In the second half of the year, this crisis exploded onto America's consciousness. 

This week, Indiana Public Broadcasting's All IN invited a pediatrician, school nurse and a principal to talk about vaping. What consequences should schools enforce for students caught vaping? And what is the best way to tackle this growing crisis? This show was in partnership with Side Effects Public Media.

Photo by Krystian-Graba/Pixabay (CC0)

Across the U.S., more than 2,000 people have reported vaping-related lung illnesses, and 47 have died. Some vaping happens in schools, so they share the burden of bringing this crisis under control. Which raises the question: what should the consequences be for a student caught vaping?

Lisa Gillespie/Side Effects Public Media

Rashelle Bernal never expected to end up in the hospital because she vaped. But she could be part of a nationwide outbreak of a severe lung illness that’s sickened more than 1,000 people. Researchers suspect those illnesses, and some deaths, are linked to vaping. Now, they're trying to find the precise cause.

Photo by Lindsayfox/Pixabay. Creative Commons license.

There have been more than 1,000 illnesses and multiple deaths linked to e-cigarettes. Now some research from Butler University finds the health problems of vaping go even further. 

Lindsay Fox/Pixabay

Across the country, there have been multiple deaths, and hundreds more illnesses, linked to e-cigarettes and vaping products. Now, doctors and scientists are looking to pinpoint the cause, while health officials coordinate an effort to find out why people are getting sick. 

AdinaVoicu/Pixabay image Creative Commons. https://pixabay.com/photos/cigarette-tobacco-smoke-smoking-3305408/

Indiana has one of the highest smoking rates in the country -- nearly one in five Hoosiers smoke. Now, a new statewide policy makes it easier for smokers to get medication to help them quit. But some people want state leaders to do more. 

Are Serious Illnesses Linked To E-Cigarettes?

Aug 19, 2019
Lindsay Fox/Pixabay

Indiana’s health department is investigating eleven cases of a severe respiratory illness to see if they’re linked to e-cigarettes. Similar cases were also discovered in Illinois and Wisconsin.

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