Research

Health researchers in Indiana are knocking on doors to collect surveys and DNA samples. A growing number of studies factor in zip code when considering health outcomes.
Jill Sheridan/IPB News

When health researchers make headlines, it’s often for a sensational project – like manipulating genes to create a baby. But others are examining broader issues, including how – and where – you live affects your health.

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One of the first uses for the buzzy gene-editing tool CRISPR could be a treatment for patients with sickle-cell disease. But the Black community’s troubled history with medical trials and testing could make testing its effectiveness difficult.

changingaging.org

A small house and a big idea are coming to the University of Southern Indiana.

The university announced it’s building a small, modular home to demonstrate how the tiny housing model could make independent living accessible for people of all ages and abilities.


NIH NIAID / Flickr (Edited)

Southern Illinois University’s medical school has halted all herpes research, one of its most high-profile projects, amid growing controversy over a researcher’s unauthorized methods offshore and in the U.S.

Forty-three of the largest public universities in the U.S. do not track student suicides, according to recent findings from The Associated Press, despite efforts to improve mental health on campus.

In Louisville, Kentucky, traditionally known as a hotbed of air pollution and an uncomfortable place to live for a person with asthma, a community-run study is using big data to figure out how to make its residents healthier.

Ted Knudsen / Flickr

Researchers from the Indiana Hemophilia & Thrombosis Center (IHTC) and Northwestern University say a genetic mutation in some Old Order Amish living in Indiana protects them from effects of aging.

Debunking The Communion Cup Myth

Nov 17, 2017
fcor1614 / Flickr

Pastor Matt Doan of Calvary Church Santa Ana, in Southern California, pours grape juice into individual plastic cups, each about half the size of a shot glass. He fits them into deep silver trays, in preparation for the next day’s Communion.


Joe Flintham/via Flickr

A much-anticipated new study found two popular opioid addiction medications are equally effective after treatment begins.

Doctors, Researchers And Parents At Odds Over ‘Safe’ Sleep

Nov 14, 2017
Barbara Brosher / WTIU News

The Indiana Department of Child Services says asphyxiation was the leading cause of child neglect deaths in fiscal year 2015. And, according to DCS data, nearly a quarter of those incidents were the result of parents failing to provide safe sleeping environments.

It's a Sunday morning at the Abyssinian Baptist Church, a famous African-American church in the Harlem area of New York City. The organist plays as hundreds of worshippers stream into the pews. The Rev. Calvin O. Butts III steps to the pulpit.

"Now may we stand for our call to worship," says Butts, as he begins a powerful three-hour service filed with music, dancing, prayers and preaching. "How good and pleasant it is when all of God's children get together."

Navigating The Realities Of Relapse And Recovery

Oct 16, 2017
Kimberley Paynter / WHYY/The Pulse

For decades, prevailing wisdom held that to overcome addiction, the most important thing to do was to flush or “clean” the drugs out of one’s system, to get a fresh start. But more and more, research into the brain, in particular, has largely found this notion to be a myth. After all, long after those chemicals are gone, the underlying addiction and the cravings are still there.


The Cycle of Opioids Addiction

Sep 19, 2017

Sound Medicine begins the new year with the return of a special program exploring the medical community’s growing awareness of opioid abuse and addiction, and the devastating consequences of prescribing opioids for pain. In this special program, we hear from expert physicians and former prescription pain addicts to explore how our use of opioids to treat pain has led to opioid abuse, and hundreds of thousands of deaths.

One of those patients, Karen, shares her story of addiction with Sound Medicine host Barbara Lewis. 

Guests include: 

It's always appealing to think that there could be an easy technical fix for a complicated and serious problem.

For example, wouldn't it be great to have a vaccine to prevent addiction?

"One of the things they're actually working on is a vaccine for addiction, which is an incredibly exciting prospect," said Dr. Tom Price, secretary of Health and Human Services.

Lag In Brain Donation Hampers Understanding Of Dementia In Blacks

Aug 9, 2017
Anna Gorman / Kaiser Health News

The question came as a shock to Dorothy Reeves: Would she be willing to donate her husband’s brain for research?

Jill Sheridan / IPB News

The world’s only normal breast tissue bank marked its 10th year collecting and researching healthy women’s breast tissue last week.

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If you’re like millions of other Americans, when a big event happens –a  shooting, a disease outbreak, a contentious election –you scour the internet to make sense of what’s going on.

American ‘Stem Cell Tourists’ Don’t Have To Travel Abroad, Study Says

Jul 7, 2016
Nissim Benvenisty / via Wikimedia Commons

The phenomenon of stem cell tourism has been associated with travel to exotic locations such as China, Argentina or Mexico, where commercial clinics with little accountability offer high hopes, expectations and — sometimes — the promise of miracle treatments for diseases ranging from muscular dystrophy to spinal cord injury.

Is it time to rethink the lab mouse? St. Louis scientists say yes

Jun 8, 2016

The classic lab mouse is black or white, eats a precisely measured diet to keep him lean, and is relatively young — probably a teenager or young adult in rodent years. His genes are nearly identical to the others around him, the result of generation upon generation of inbreeding for research purposes.

Those specs might help a scientist standardize her experiments, but they may also be holding some research back for one type of cancer drug, two St. Louis researchers argued in a recent review. Instead, they say that pre-clinical trials should include older mice, obese mice, and mice with different types of gut microbiota.

If A New Cancer Drug Is Hailed As A Breakthrough, Odds Are It's Not

Oct 29, 2015

Miracle. Game changer. Marvel. Cure. Lifesaver.

For Dr. Vinay Prasad, each one of these words was a little straw on the camel's back. At oncology conferences, they were used "indiscriminately" to describe new cancer drugs. Journalists bandied them about in stories.

Finally, the pile of hyperbole broke the camel's back.

PSC1121-GO via Flickr

After a review of the research connecting red meats and processed meats to cancer, a group of WHO researchers published their findings today.

Called Back After A Mammogram? Doctors Are Trying To Make It Less Scary

Oct 15, 2015

When I left my first mammogram appointment a few weeks ago, I felt fine.

Everything had gone smoothly, the technologist hadn't made a concerned face when she looked at the screen, and I was convinced I'd get the all-clear from my primary care doctor in a week or so.

Then came the phone calls the following day — first from my doctor's office, then from the mammography center — telling me the radiologist had seen something that didn't look quite right. I needed to come back for another mammogram and this time an ultrasound exam, too.

Cruelty of Teen Bullying Feeds Into Adult Depression

Jun 5, 2015
Two teen girls talking taunting another teen girl
zalouk webdesign/CC via Wikimedia Commons

If you’ve ever sat in a therapist’s chair wondering if those bullies from junior high are responsible for your adult depression, a study published earlier this week in the British Medical Journal lends weight to your theory.

At 59 years old, Michael Froome just got a new heart.  His problem goes back 20 years after a chest pain led his doctor to order a cardiac stress test.

“When they put on the last electrode so the monitor comes live with your data, someone in the room goes, ‘Oh! That’s not good,’” Froome recalled.

Spencer Rosero, a cardiologist at the University of Rochester Medical Center, is one of Froome’s doctors. He has an idea that could cut the number of hospital visits patients like Froome have to make.

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