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Doctor Who Died From Ebola Was A 'Tremendous Human Being'

Last month, Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan, a prestigious doctor in Sierra Leone died after contracting Ebola. Khan was the head of the Lassa Fever Program at the Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone.

The country’s health minister called Khan a “national hero.”

But as the outbreak continues, more health workers are putting themselves at risk to save others.

Dr.Robert Garry, a professor of microbiology and immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine, tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that about 10 percent of the victims so far have been healthcare workers.

Garry was a friend and colleague of Khan, and worked with Tulane researchers at the hospital in Kenema.

“Dr. Khan was well aware of the risk of working with both Lassa fever and Ebola fever,” Garry recalled. “The fact that he managed to get infected is a great tragedy.”

Garry called Khan a “tremendous human being” who was very dedicated to his patients and a great teacher.

Khan is not the only colleague of Garry’s working to treat people in the disease-laden environment.

“I am very concerned about those people,” he said. “Everybody is at risk.”

Guest

  • Robert Garry, professor of microbiology and immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine.

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