Veterans

VA To Offer Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy For Some Veterans With PTSD

Jan 20, 2018
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Jason Emery is sitting at the dining room table in his Greenfield, Indiana home. He takes one of his guitars off the wall and starts strumming the notes to a song he wrote. It's here that Emery finds solace.

PTSD Complicates End-Of-Life Care For Some Veterans

Dec 19, 2017
Steven Tom / Flickr

Ron Fleming is 74 now, but he's spent most of his life trying to recapture what life felt like when he was 21, fighting in Vietnam.


Seth Herald / for WOSU

On a fall morning, Gary Jones takes a walk in his wooded property in Licking County, Ohio. Like many people, long walks helps him to clear his head.

“So it’s all kind of a similar thing, it’s just a little exaggerated with, uh, post-traumatic stress,” Jones says.


American Legion Of Indiana Wants Medical Marijuana Legalized To Ease Vet Pain

Jan 16, 2017
Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Media

The American Legion of Indiana passed a resolution Sunday calling on Congress to recognize marijuana as a drug with medical value and asking Indiana legislatures to develop a medical marijuana program.

Veterans Turn To Yoga To Help Treat PTSD

Aug 30, 2016
Jill Sheridan/WFYI

An estimated 8 million people in the United States suffer from PTSD: post-traumatic stress disorder. In Indiana, as many as 50,000 Hoosier veterans could be dealing with it. But a new program is exploring a novel treatment: yoga.

Once Again, the VA Turns Down Navy Vets for Agent Orange Benefits

Feb 9, 2016
USS Patapsco  off shore of Cua Viet, 1967
Kenneth Fuller / Naval History & Heritage Command

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has once again turned down an effort by Navy veterans to get compensation for possible exposure to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.

In a document released Friday, the VA said it would continue to limit benefits related to Agent Orange exposure to only those veterans who set foot in Vietnam, where the herbicide was sprayed, and to those who were on boats in inland rivers. The VA compensates these veterans for a litany of associated illnesses, including diabetes, various cancers, Parkinson's Disease, peripheral neuropathy and a type of heart disease. 

Chicago Teens And Combat Veterans Join Forces To Process Trauma

Jan 26, 2016

If you took a map of Chicago and put down a tack for each person shot last year, you'd need nearly 3,000 tacks.

Of those, 101 would be clustered in the neighborhood of East Garfield Park. That's where 15-year-old Jim Courtney-Clarks lives.

"To be honest, I really don't like it," Courtney-Clarks says. "Every time you look up somebody else is getting killed, and I never know if it's me or somebody I am really close to."

New VA Clinic Opens For Transgender Vets

Jan 4, 2016

A Veterans Affairs hospital in Tucson, Ariz., is expanding treatment to a previously underserved faction of the armed services: transgender veterans.

It's one of the first VA hospitals in the country to open a clinic devoted specifically to the needs of veterans like Sue McConnell.

"In 1994 I was diagnosed with PTSD. I was also dealing with the fact that I was a woman," McConnell says.

Lauren Silverman / KERA

It’s common to train service dogs to help veterans with physical disabilities. But how about helping them with post traumatic stress disorder? The Veterans Administration is launching a major study to find out what effect specially-trained service dogs can have on a veterans ability to cope with life after service. Veterans who already rely on service dogs say the research should have been done years ago.


Behind Bars, Vets With PTSD Face A New War Zone, With Little Support

Nov 5, 2015

At the county court in Waukesha, Wis., in September, Iraq veteran David Carlson sat before a judge hoping he hadn't run out of second chances.

The judge read out his record: drugs, drunken driving, stealing booze while on parole, battery while in prison. Then the judge listed an almost equal number of previous opportunities he'd had at treatment or early release.

Carlson faced as much as six more years on lockdown — or the judge could give him time served and release him to a veterans treatment program instead.

The judge's tone was not encouraging.

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