SARAH FENTEM | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Medical foods are vital for a rare disease. Why doesn’t insurance cover them?

Every day, Amanda Moller scoops powdered formula out of a can and shakes it up with water from her kitchen sink in University City, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis. “It's like mixing a cocktail,” she said, "but not that much fun."

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On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

The opioid addiction crisis is often reported on in desperate terms. But, to the people working on the frontlines of the problem, there are known and proven approaches that can help.

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In parts of the country hit hard by addiction, some public health officials are considering running sites where people can use heroin and other illegal drugs under medical supervision. Advocates say these facilities, known as supervised injection sites, save lives that would otherwise be lost to overdoses and provide a bridge to treatment.

Credit: WFIU/WTIU

Over the last six years, enough opioids were shipped to the state of Missouri to give every resident 260 pills.

The finding comes from a report released Thursday by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo. It's the latest in a series of investigations by the senator into the role of drugmakers, distributors and other industry players in fueling the opioid epidemic.

Rising Premiums Price Some Missouri And Illinois Consumers Out Of Health Care Exchange

Jul 12, 2018
DAVID KOVALUK | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

The rising costs of insurance plans available through the federal healthcare.gov website may make them unaffordable for some people in Missouri and Illinois.

Premiums for exchange plans on healthcare.gov have become more expensive, but most people who buy exchange plans on healthcare.gov receive tax credits to help them offset the cost and are insulated from rising costs. But those who don’t receive those credits bear the brunt of those increased prices.

Democrats Rally Against Threats To The ACA To Block Trump’s Supreme Court Nominee

Jul 12, 2018
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Senate Democrats, who are divided on abortion policy, are instead turning to health care as a rallying cry for opposition to President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

Specifically, they are sounding the alarm that confirming conservative District Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh could jeopardize one of the Affordable Care Act’s most popular provisions — its protections for people with preexisting health conditions.

If High Court Reverses Roe v. Wade, 22 States Likely To Ban Abortion

Jul 11, 2018
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What would the U.S. look like without Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case that legalized abortion nationwide?

That’s the question now that President Donald Trump has chosen conservative Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his nominee to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Fort Wayne Planned Parenthood Office Shuts Due To Harassment

Jul 11, 2018
ARACELI GOMEZ-ALDANA / WBOI

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky will be closing its Fort Wayne health center.

On Monday, President and CEO Christie Gillespie attributed the closure to intimidation and harassment, beyond the ritual protesting. The harassment included the sharing of personal information like home address of staff.

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More nurse practitioners are stepping up to meet the needs of Hoosier patients as Indiana grapples with a shortage of primary care doctors.

Debate over reproductive rights heats up again in Missouri

Jul 10, 2018
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President Donald Trump’s newest nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court simply adds to the latest round of heightened political tensions in Missouri over reproductive rights and abortion.

And, as expected, it’s already become a key issue in the state’s closely watched U.S. Senate race. Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is making the Supreme Court confirmation the centerpiece of the Republican U.S. Senate candidate’s first TV ad, which began airing Monday.

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New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds only 15 percent of Hoosiers get the recommended amount of weekly physical activity. 

The guidelines were established in 2008 and include weekly aerobic activity and muscle strengthening exercise. The CDC data from 2010-2015 ranks Hoosiers 47th nationwide for meeting the recommendations.

Only 10 percent of Indiana’s women meet the levels.

State Prisons Fail To Offer Cure To 144,000 Inmates With Deadly Hepatitis C

Jul 9, 2018
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State prisons across the U.S. are failing to treat at least 144,000 inmates who have hepatitis C, a curable but potentially fatal liver disease, according to a recent survey and subsequent interviews of state corrections departments.

Many of the 49 states that responded to questions about inmates with hepatitis C cited high drug prices as the reason for denying treatment. The drugs can cost up to $90,000 for a course of treatment.

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The Workaround

The Workaround: A New Podcast From Side Effects Public Media

These are stories of the difficult and sometimes shocking things people do to work around the American healthcare system.

Side Effects, Indiana

Public health news focused on Indiana

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