depression

PHOTO BY ENGIN AKYURT ON UNSPLASH

Dani Hoover is a 26-year-old social worker in Indianapolis. She has battled depression and anxiety since high school, and the pandemic hasn’t made it any easier.

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a stressful time, and a lot of people experiencing anxiety and depression might be feeling it for the first time.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s All In spoke with mental health experts about what these things feel like, why they happen and what can be done to help.

Ben Wicks / Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a toll on children’s mental health across the country. Advocates are trying to address the problem, but resources can be limited, and in Iowa, plans for a statewide mental health system for children have run into problems.

Photo by Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people over 65 have the highest risk for deadly complications from the new coronavirus. So they’ve been told to stay quarantined. But loneliness can trigger other serious health problems in seniors, like depression or dementia. This has left senior centers facing tough decisions about staying open.

Photo by Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

In rural areas, access to mental health services can be limited, sometimes even more so for teens and children. And the need for these services is growing, so one Midwestern school is using technology to help bridge this gap.

In Post-Treatment Cancer Patients, Depression Can Take A Toll

Jan 30, 2019
CAROLINA HIDALGO/ ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Two decades ago, Jim Nace was a national ice cream salesman, on cross-country flights 20 days a month. He was on top of the world.

“I had a great lifestyle, lots of money, vacations; I was very caught up in the world I was in,” he said. “And then I got a sore throat.”

His wife, a dental hygienist, saw something that didn’t look quite right. A visit to the doctor confirmed the worst: It was tonsil cancer. Soon after his diagnosis, his company terminated his job.

When the birth control pill debuted more than 50 years ago, women wanted to know: Is it safe? There wasn't much evidence to answer that question, but women embraced the Pill as a revolutionary improvement in contraception.

Increase In Youth Suicide Prompts States To Act

Sep 28, 2016
Stathis Stavrianos/via Flickr

SALT LAKE CITY — When J.D. Goates was 17 and newly graduated from high school, he decided that he had had enough.

Suicide Rates Climb In U.S., Especially Among Adolescent Girls

Apr 22, 2016

In the '80s and '90s, America's suicide trend was headed in the right direction: down.

"It had been decreasing almost steadily since 1986, and then what happened is there was a turnaround," says Sally Curtin, a statistician with the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Doctors Often Fail To Treat Depression Like A Chronic Illness

Mar 7, 2016

Depression prompts people to make about 8 million doctors' appointments a year, and more than half are with primary care physicians. A study suggests those doctors often fall short in treating depression because of insurance issues, time constraints and other factors.

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