Carter Barrett

Reporter, Side Effects Public Media

Carter is a reporter based at WFYI in Indianapolis, Indiana. A long-time Hoosier, she is thrilled to stay in her hometown to cover public health. Previously, she covered education for WFYI News with a focus on school safety. Carter graduated with a journalism degree from Indiana University, and previously interned with stations in Bloomington, Indiana and Juneau, Alaska.

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We asked you, our listeners and readers, to share  your concerns with healthcare costs. And the results are in. 

Photo by Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

Communities across the Midwest have been devastated by the opioid epidemic. But there's still a lot of misunderstanding about how opioids affect our bodies. A new and unusual museum exhibit is tackling this issue. 

Photo by Fangirl/Pixabay CCO license. https://pixabay.com/photos/texting-boy-teenager-sitting-1999275/

Dr. Darla Hinshaw walks up to the podium in the Indiana Senate chamber. She's there to tell lawmakers about the children she treats as a psychiatrist and the issue standing between kids and effective treatment.  

Natalie Krebs / Side Effects Public Media

The federal government recently raised the smoking age to 21 to help curb teen vaping.  Some are applauding the decision as a win for public health. Others worry it was a knee-jerk reaction.

An "open tank" e-cigarettes sits on the counter at Mason Odle's vape store, Just Vapor. These larger, open tank systems are exempt from FDA regulations on flavors.
Photo by Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

Just a few weeks ago, some Midwest state legislatures were aiming to raise the legal age for smoking. But Congress moved first, setting a new national age limit of 21. Now, some anti-smoking advocates say that’s not enough. 

Photo by Krystian-Graba/Pixabay (CC0)

Across the U.S., more than 2,000 people have reported vaping-related lung illnesses, and 47 have died. Some vaping happens in schools, so they share the burden of bringing this crisis under control. Which raises the question: what should the consequences be for a student caught vaping?

Photo by Lauren Chapman/Indiana Public Broadcasting.
Photo by Lauren Chapman/Indiana Public Broadcasting.

Indiana has applied for a 10-year extension of its Medicaid health insurance program, known as the Healthy Indiana Plan. This fairly routine move sparked passionate public commentary on Tuesday afternoon. 

Photo by Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

It’s a Friday evening and a dozen or so people -- men, women, teenagers, little kids -- are gathered at TITLE Boxing Club. It’s an upscale boxing studio near a largely vacant shopping mall on Indianapolis' northside. 

Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

On Thursday, Indiana temporarily suspended its Medicaid work requirement program known as Gateway to Work. Like several other states, it faced a court challenge to rules that could have eliminated health insurance for many low-income Hoosiers. 

Pixabay PublicDomainPictures / 17913 images

In 1983, Indianapolis hosted one of the first summits on the emotional and psychological mistreatment of children. This week,  local, state and international leaders are meeting in the city, looking for new ways to tackle the problem. 

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