Smoking

U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell said he will introduce a bill raising the minimum age to buy cigarettes, vaping devices and other tobacco products from 18 to 21 across the country.

During a news conference in Louisville Thursday, McConnell said he will introduce the legislation in May.

“By raising the age you could legally purchase to 21, tobacco won’t be in most high schools, presenting fewer opportunities for children to get their hands on vaping devices,” McConnell said.

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An estimated 21 percent of Hoosiers smoke – one of the highest smoking rates in the country. 

But of the nine bills related to smoking, cigarettes, and e-liquids introduced at the Statehouse this session, only two are moving forward. 

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Health officials say teenagers are using e-cigarettes at epidemic rates. Lawmakers in a number of Midwest states, like Indiana, Illinois and Minnesota, are addressing the problem and so is the FDA.

Photo from Wikimedia Commons is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Smoking looks a lot different these days. It’s been on the decline, due to restrictions at work and in bars and restaurants. But there is one segment—teenagers who use e-cigarettes—that is growing fast. And health experts are worried about the consequences.

 

New Reports Calculate Lives Lost To Tobacco, Opioids

Oct 30, 2018

Two new reports from the Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation outline the loss of life in Indiana from two epidemics: tobacco and opioids

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends states spend more than $73 million annually on tobacco cessation and prevention efforts. A new report finds Indiana spends just more than 10 percent of that amount, less than half the national average.

The state spent just more than $8 million in federal and state funds in 2016 to help people quit smoking or prevent them from starting.

CREATIVE COMMONS/PIXABAY

Indiana spent more money on anti-smoking programs this year than last. But it’s still a lot less than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends.


More apartments are becoming smoke-free in Marion County.

Smoke Free Indy, a group from the Marion County Health Department, surveyed over 300 properties this year, and found 24 percent do not allow smoking. In 2015 only 14 percent were smoke-free, and when the group first surveyed apartment complexes in 2013 only 4 percent prohibited smoking.

Emily Forman / WFYI

One hot afternoon in June, in the parking lot of a dollar store in the near east side of Indianapolis, Kelly Davila sets a timer on her phone. It takes two minutes to walk from the Family Dollar store to a gas station convenience store - both places sell cigarettes. 

Hopes Dim To Raise Indiana’s Cigarette Tax This Year

Apr 18, 2017
Creative Commons/Pixabay
Creative Commons/Pixabay

In the last few hours of the legislative session, as lawmakers work out the final details of the budget, the proposed cigarette tax increase faces its last chance to pass.

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