America Amplified

Side Effects Public Media is working closely with Indiana Public Broadcasting and WFYI to increase engagement journalism efforts this year. We’re also partnering with other public radio stations and collaborations in a reporting initiative called America Amplified: Election 2020.

The $1.9 million national initiative, funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, was designed to bring a different kind of reporting into public media coverage of this year’s election. In light of the current health crisis, America Amplified is pivoting to focus on the coronavirus pandemic and providing resources to engage with the communities they cover.

America Amplified aims to put people, not preconceived ideas, at the center of its reporting process. In this era of “social distancing,” we will use tools such as crowd-sourcing, virtual town halls, surveys and social media to listen first to the concerns and aspirations of communities across the country. The results will then be reported back through a network of participating public media stations across the country.

America Amplified is working with seven established public media collaborations — Side Effects Public Media, StateImpact Pennsylvania, Ohio Valley ReSource, the Mountain West News Bureau, I-4 Votes, Harvest Public Media and the New England News Collaborative — as well as with WABE in Atlanta.

Other partners include APM Research Lab, BBC and the Public Agenda/USA Today/Ipso Hidden Common Ground initiative.

Follow America Amplified on Twitter at @amplified2020 or visit www.americaamplified.org to sign up for our newsletter.

Justin Hicks/Indiana Public Broadcasting

We’re continuing to answer questions about the coronavirus and COVID-19, and lately there have been a lot about states reopening. As that happens, how can you stay safe? And do the rules about masks, hand-washing and social distancing still apply?

Pixabay

Continuamos respondiendo a tus preguntas acerca del coronavirus y la COVID-19. Si tienes preguntas, envíanos un correo electrónico a health@wfyi.org, un texto con la palabra “salud” al 73224 o déjanos un mensaje de voz en el 317-429-0080.

¿Qué precauciones extra debe tomar mi obstetra y el hospital cuando tenga a mi bebe?

You Asked: How Do I Get Tested For COVID-19?

May 14, 2020
Justin Hicks/Indiana Public Broadcasting

We're continuing to answer questions about the coronavirus and COVID-19, and the latest batch showed that there's still a lot of confusion about testing. Who needs it, how is it done, where is it done—and more. 

Courtesy of Steven Abdo

This is part of Essential Voices, a series of interviews with people confronting COVID-19.

Long term care facilities have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. More than half of the coronavirus deaths in Iowa have been residents at these facilities. To try to keep residents safe, most have been closed to visitors since March. Steven Abdo, a nurse aide at Oaknoll Retirement Residence in Iowa City for four years, explains what it’s like to work with residents who don’t know when they can see their families again.

Photo by engin akyurt on Unsplash

Some fear the stress of social isolation, historic unemployment and health fears during the pandemic threatens our mental health. Dozens of national organizations raised concerns to Congress that the U.S. is unprepared to handle what may be a mental health crisis.

Photo courtesy of Gabriel and Sarah Bosslet

This is part of Essential Voices, a series of interviews with people confronting COVID-19.

Physicians Gabriel and Sarah Bosslet have been married almost 20 years. Sarah was diagnosed early this year with breast cancer. Soon, the world began dealing with another health crisis: the coronavirus pandemic. 

CDC

Para darle contenido significativo a sus videntes en el reportaje, por favor compare el número actual de muertes por el COVID-19 con el número promedio de muertes por la gripe en los Estados Unidos en la última década.

Grinnell Regional Medical Center

This is part of Essential Voices, a series of interviews with people confronting COVID-19.

Hospitals across the Midwest have adjusted policies for the coronavirus crisis -- including limiting patient visitors. That can be especially hard when a patient is near death, and friends and relatives want to share a final goodbye. Dr. Lauren Graham speaks about those emotional moments at Grinnell Regional Medical Center in Iowa.

Update: As the case count continues to rise, information on this story is moving quickly and may be out-of-date. We recommend checking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for ways to stay safe and this John Hopkins tool for the most recent data

States are considering how, and when, to reopen their economies. But the process looks different across the country, and there's a considerable variety even in the Midwest. Side Effects Public Media’s Brittani Howell spoke with Indiana Public Broadcasting’s statehouse reporter Brandon Smith, KBIA health reporter Sebastián Martínez Valdivia and Iowa Public Radio health reporter Natalie Krebs about how their states have reacted so far, and what they might do going forward.

Jim Meadows/Illinois Newsroom

This is part of Essential Voices, a series of interviews with people confronting COVID-19.

Since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, local public health agencies across the nation have been working to mitigate the spread of the disease -- and to overcome some big obstacles.

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