Sandy Roob

Reporter, Sound Medicine

Sandy Roob is a contributing reporter with Sound Medicine and writes the health and fitness segments called “Help Yourself.”  Prior to working with the program, Roob spent a decade as the host of “IU Update” that aired during IU Men’s televised basketball games. During that time she also worked as a media specialist at IUPUI and was responsible for overseeing media coverage for the School of Nursing and other university programs. Roob, an award-winning journalist, began her career as a television news reporter at WNDU in South Bend, Ind., where she wrote a documentary, numerous news series, and anchored the news. She has a Communications degree from DePauw University and a Master’s in Journalism from Indiana University. 

Researcher Natascia Marino seated next to a microscope
Sandy Roob

Any biologist worth her salt knows that to properly study abnormal cells – say, cancer cells – you need normal healthy cells for comparison. Before the Komen Tissue Bank opened in Indianapolis in 2007, cancer researchers would take “normal” breast tissue from a cancer patient – two centimeters from her tumor-- or from breast reduction surgeries, according to executive director Dr. Anna Maria Storniolo. “As you might imagine, two centimeters away from a cancer molecularly speaking can’t possibly be really normal,” she says.

Alice Martina Smith and her service dog, Asti.
Sandy Roob

 

Dogs interpret their surroundings mostly by smell, while we humans get most of our information through sight. And it’s no wonder: our canine companions have 300 million scent glands compared to our five million. That keen sense of smell is being used to train canines to detect glucose levels and save lives. If you’re an insulin dependent- type one diabetic, you may be able to improve your health by working with a diabetes alert dog.

school lunch
Sandy Roob

Jaclyn Keifer, a registered dietician with IU Health, shares tips on packing healthy school lunches.