opiods

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On this sweltering summer day, only a few people walk by Mousie’s restaurant. The building’s blue facade stands out next to its neutral surroundings. In one of its circular windows, there’s a neon ‘open’ sign that’s turned off. 

It's just one example of the economic decline in Connersville, Ind., once known as "Little Detroit."


Paige Pfleger/Side Effects Public Media

An Ohio doctor being investigated for the suspicious deaths of dozens of hospital patients has been charged with 25 counts of murder.

Leigh DeNoon

As the opioid epidemic continues, hospitals are looking for new ways to treat pain and combat addiction. At Indiana University Health, which has 16 hospitals across the state, that means change. They’re cutting back on opioid prescriptions and giving more advice to patients.

Lisa Gillespie/Side Effects Public Media

Getting to Anne Polston’s house is a journey: first, you have to get to Liberty, a town about two hours southeast of Louisville. Then, there’s a winding eight-mile road that’s largely one-lane, and sometimes just gravel.

The opioid epidemic has ravaged cities across the United States. And just a couple of years ago, Dayton, Ohio, had one of the nation’s worst overdose death rates. Now, overdose deaths have decreased, and Ohioans impacted by addiction are sharing stories of hope.

Credit Sebastián Martínez Valdivia/Side Effects Public Media

About 15 miles southwest of St. Louis is Fenton City Park. It’s pretty unremarkable, with picnic shelters, softball fields, and flags waving gently from a memorial to fallen soldiers. This is where Kevin Mullane sought refuge as he struggled with an opioid addiction.

Stories of Recovery And Hope: James

Dec 14, 2018
Photo by Steve Buissinne is licensed under CC 0. https://pixabay.com/en/pills-medication-tablets-bottle-384846/

James, who asked to only be identified by his middle name, tried Oxycontin for the first time when he was in college. "We all know how this narrative goes — A young, healthy, normal person finds drugs and essentially starts to ruin their life." James got sober, but his brother didn't.

This story was produced by Matt Pelsor. On Monday, Dec. 17, at 9 p.m. tune into WFYI for an hour-long special on these stories.

The Indiana Attorney General filed a lawsuit Wednesday against Connecticut-based Purdue Pharma. The lawsuit alleges the company minimized the risks of addiction and exaggerated the benefits of opioids.

Photo by Premier of Alberta is licensed under CC 2.0. https://www.flickr.com/photos/premierofalberta/31929263514/in/photolist-QDtPDm-YsqDgz-VrvBd9-TNqRBt-diXDRj-JcJM5b-HdyJSY-25LNrmk-29sShUj-255tFtY-23mZHY6-28auU3b-29MikCR-s5H19H-246J497-aPhrwT-29bALCU-sm

Popular rapper Mac Miller is the latest musician to die after ingesting fentanyl — a grim tribute to the drug’s power. A coroner in Los Angeles says Miller had fentanyl, cocaine and ethanol in his system when he overdosed in September.

State and health leaders met at an Indianapolis hospital Monday to announce a new project to help pregnant Hoosier mothers who are addicted to opioids, the effort expands a pilot to reduce neonatal abstinence syndrome or NAS.

NAS happens when a baby is exposed to drugs in the womb.  Providers at Community East Hospital addressed this issue in response to the rise in cases that they were seeing says OBGYN Anthony Sanders. 

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