Healthy In Any Language: Refugee And Immigrant Health

Throughout 2019, Side Effects will examine the health care challenges that refugees and immigrants face in the U.S. Language barriers, cultural misunderstandings and our complex bureaucracy can interfere with effective care.

Have a story idea? Email health@wfyi.org

Ways to Connect

CDC

Para darle contenido significativo a sus videntes en el reportaje, por favor compare el número actual de muertes por el COVID-19 con el número promedio de muertes por la gripe en los Estados Unidos en la última década.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News.

El Gobernador Eric Holcomb anunció una orden de permanecer en casa para todo el estado el la semana pasada. Mientras hay nuevas restricciones a través del estado, hay un número de cosas que puedes hacer y negocios que permanecerán abiertos.

¿Qué Necesita Saber Acerca Del Coronavirus? Tenemos Respuestas

Mar 20, 2020
Illustration by the CDC.

Mientras los casos del coronavirus se siguen propagando por el Medio Oeste, sabemos que hay muchas preguntas acerca del virus -- incluyendo cómo evitar contagiarse. También sabemos que hay mucha información incorrecta acerca del virus, así que queremos ayudarte a separar los hechos de la ficción. Envíe sus preguntas a health@wfyi.org o envíe un mensaje de texto con la palabra “eleccion” al 73224, y encontraremos las respuestas. 

¿Que es el coronavirus y COVID-19?

Why Latinos Are Less Likely To Seek Healthcare

Dec 20, 2019
Photo by Annacaroline Caruso/Side Effects

Hispanics are the least likely racial and ethnic group to see a doctor when they have health problems. That’s according to a study by the Census Bureau. There are several barriers that discourage some from that community from seeking medical attention in the U.S.

Natalie Krebs / Side Effects Public Media

Figuring out America’s healthcare system can be hard for anyone. It can be especially challenging for refugees, who often face significant language and cultural barriers. But one group is trying to bridge that gap by training refugees as health navigators in their own communities.


Carter Barrett/Side Effects Public Media.

Across the United States, there’s a push to give new doctors cultural training to work with refugees and other immigrants. And some say it’s the difference between healthy and sick patients.

Photo by Lauren Bavis/Side Effects Public Media.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide, which left hundreds of thousands of people dead. Kazito Kalima still carries horrific memories of that time, and he shared them at a symposium.

Illustration by Tamara Cubrilo

When José moved his family to the U.S. from Mexico nearly two decades ago, he had hopes of giving his children a better life.

But now he worries about the future of his 21-year-old-son, who was diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder last year.


Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Deepa Halaharvi is a morning person.

"Eat, read, pray, and get ready to go to work," she says, laughing. "And usually I’m out the door around 6:15 or 6:30."

Lauren Bavis/Side Effects Public Media

Refugees face unique challenges to getting mental health care in the United States. Cultural differences, stigma and language barriers can make finding treatment difficult. 

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